Sacred Heart Health System

Linda Dunwoody

Sacred Heart Health System Friday unveiled new, state-of-the-art vehicles for the hospital-to-hospital transport of newborns through age 18, to and from Children’s Hospital in Pensacola.

“That’s what this is all about,” said Sacred Heart Hospital President Henry Stovall. “It’s about children who are in crisis, families who are in an emergency. And they look to the Children’s Hospital at Sacred Heart for help. Sometimes, desperate help.”

In light of reports of the handful of Ebola cases elsewhere in the US, healthcare workers in Florida and Pensacola are making their own preparations just in case. However, there have been no Ebola cases here, or in the rest of Florida.

Suspected Ebola cases reported in Miami and Jacksonville this week turned out to be something else. Governor Rick Scott last week asked hospitals across Florida – large and small -- to require that their healthcare professionals undergo safety training to guard against Ebola measure.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF News

Sacred Heart Health System dedicated its new Bayou Tower facility on the main campus in Pensacola on Friday. WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody reports the major expansion adds five stories to its Heart and Vascular facility.

The $52 million project – dubbed Bayou Tower – adds another 112 beds to Sacred Heart’s main hospital. The cost was paid from reserves and private donations, with no added debt. In 2012, Interim CEO Susan Davis said the addition would create what she called “the patient experience of the future.”

Plans have been unveiled for more growth at Sacred Heart Health Center’s Emerald Coast facility in Miramar Beach.

The $30 million expansion project is aimed at increasing capacity in four service areas: inpatient, maternity, emergency, and pediatric.

Hospital President Roger Hall says they’re looking to expand in-patient capacity by about two dozen beds, covering 20,000 square feet. That also includes beds for their youngest and smallest patients.

Work is underway at Naval Hospital Pensacola to morph the facility’s emergency room into an Urgent Care Center as of June 1.

Hospital commander, Capt. Maureen Padden, says Navy medicine has been conducted a resource analysis the past two years – well before last year’s sequester and partial shutdown of the federal government. At issue by the Naval Bureau of Medicine and Surgery is just where critical resources should be placed to best serve the beneficiary population.