Boy Scouts of America

Gates: Consider Allowing Gay Boy Scout Leaders

Delegates at last week’s annual meeting of the Boy Scouts of America in Atlanta heard a call for an end to the organization’s ban on gay troop leaders. BSA President and former Defense Sec Robert Gates told the meeting that they can neither overlook the growing in-house challenges to current leadership policy, nor what’s going on nationwide. “I remind you of the recent debates we’ve seen in Indiana, Arkansas and elsewhere over discrimination based on sexual orientation, not to mention the...
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Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Pensacola Beach Recovers From Big Crowds And A Big Storm

On Tuesday morning Chris Carter was loading the metal skeleton of a pop up beach tent onto the trailer of his truck. The Gulf Breeze resident says things looked a lot different over the weekend. "Over the weekend it looked like a catastrophe. There were these pop-up tents and tents and air mattresses and floats. The storms came through...Sunday morning and everyone left in a panic and the beach was in disarray." Over on the beach, some young people were picking up trash along the sand and in...
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Bob Barrett / WUWF News

 To a lot of people, Guy Harvey is just a name on tropical shirts and hats.

   But this summer in downtown Pensacola, he is the main attraction at the museum of art. Through the month of August the Pensacola Museum of Art is featuring the artwork Dr. Harvey as its Summer Blockbuster exhibit called “Guy Harvey – The Lure of the Ocean.”  Mary Hartshorn, Director of Communications for the Museum says having the exhibit available all summer long was important to make Harvey's art available to the widest audience possible, young and old - local and visitor.

As candidates hit the campaign trail, NPR looks at four major issues the next president will face from Day 1 in office.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

Rick Santorum, the former Republican senator from Pennsylvania, announced today that he is running for president.

"Working families don't need another president tied to big government or big money," he said in Cabot, Pa.. "And today is the day we're going to begin to fight back."

At Georgia's Fort Benning, female soldiers are fighting a two-month battle. Their enemies? Hunger, fatigue, even hallucination. They're fighting their way through the Army's notoriously hard Ranger School, trying to make history by becoming the first women to graduate from it.

It's one of several Pentagon experiments to see how best to move women into ground combat roles. And it's a test that thousands of men before them have failed.

You can't tell by looking which students at Mount Sinai's school of medicine in New York City were traditional pre-meds as undergraduates and which weren't. And that's exactly the point.

Most of the class majored in biology or chemistry, crammed for the medical college admission test and got flawless grades and scores.

License plate scanners have become a fact of life. They're attached to traffic lights, on police cars — even "repo" staff use them. All those devices have created a torrent of data, raising new concerns about how it's being stored and analyzed.

Bryce Newell's laptop is filled with the comings and goings of Seattle residents. The data comes from the city's license plate scanner, acquired from the police through public disclosure requests. He plugs in a license plate number, uncovering evidence of long-forgotten errands.

Four years ago, pledges were en vogue in the early going of the Republican presidential primary. But a prominent one, that landed some of the candidates in hot water, is being nixed this time around.

Underneath railway arches on a nondescript street in North London, you'll find an old warehouse that's the epicenter of the Ottolenghi food empire.

Jerusalem-born food impresario Yotam Ottolenghi and his business partner, Sami Tamimi, started out over a decade ago with one restaurant in London selling fresh, Middle East-inspired food. The business now encompasses several restaurants, an expanding online food business and some cookbooks that have been wildly successful on their home turf and here in the U.S.

Two research chimps got their day in court — though they weren't actually present in the courtroom.

Steven Wise, an attorney with the Nonhuman Rights Project, told Manhattan Supreme Court Judge Barbara Jaffe that Hercules and Leo, the 8-year-old research chimps at Stony Brook University on Long Island, are "autonomous and self-determining beings" who should be granted a writ of habeas corpus, which would effectively recognize them as legal persons. The chimps, he argued, should be moved from the university to a sanctuary in Florida.

A heat wave in India has left over 1,100 people dead over the past month. In the capital New Delhi, 113 degree Fahrenheit temperatures have melted roadway crosswalks.

The sweltering heat will continue for at least another week when the annual monsoon rains begin. The BBC’s Delhi correspondent Zubair Ahmad joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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