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UWF Men's Basketball Enjoying A Renaissance

While much of the attention of late has been on the University of West Florida football program, another UWF squad has been quietly making some history of its own. Last week head coach Jeff Burkhamer and the team worked on different offenses and defenses in preparation for the next two games – both on the road. The Argos played at Union on Saturday, and at Christian Brothers on Monday night, winning both. Burkhamer came to UWF in 2015, taking over a team that had won only seven games the...

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Where alcohol is eschewed in most places of employment, it's a constant in restaurants. And the late night culture means that most socializing happens at bars after work hours. "We're an industry that's a little bit different," says Mickey Bakst, general manager of Charleston Grill in South Carolina. But this also means restaurant employees are at serious risk for problems with substance abuse.

Nearly 90 women who allege they were sexually assaulted by a former USA Gymnastics doctor plan to speak about the abuse during a four-day sentencing hearing that started Tuesday.

Larry Nassar is accused of sexually abusing more than 140 women and girls as the doctor for Team USA and Michigan State University.

He has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Mich., to seven first-degree sexual assault charges. Before ordering a sentence, the judge in the case is allowing all of his accusers to speak, if they want to.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

Peter Morgan, creator of the Netflix series The Crown, has an unusual take on Britain's royals. He says, "Let's just stop thinking about them as a royal family for just a second and think about them as just a regular family."

Like any family, Morgan says, the House of Windsor has its share of shame, regret and "misdemeanors of the past;" and, of course, "no family is complete without an embarrassing uncle." In the case of the Windsors, the uncle in question was King Edward VIII, who abdicated the throne 1936, paving the way for Elizabeth to become queen in 1952.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, better known as the Mormon church, has named 93-year-old Russell M. Nelson as its new president.

"I express my deep love for you — love that has grown over decades of meeting you, worshipping with you and serving you," Nelson, a former surgeon and longtime church leader, said in a live video announcement Tuesday morning from the Salt Lake Temple in Utah.

Capitol Hill Republicans are nervous about November. The margins of their majority are dwindling in both chambers. It's looking like a good year to run as a Democrat, and President Trump isn't helping with his weak polls and potent controversies.

A high-level investigation into chronic absenteeism in Washington, D.C., high schools has found that students across the city were graduated despite having missed more than 30 days of school in a single course, in violation of district policy.

goargos.com with permission

While much of the attention of late has been on the University of West Florida football program, another UWF squad has been quietly making some history of its own.

Last week head coach Jeff Burkhamer and the team worked on different offenses and defenses in preparation for the next two games – both on the road. The Argos played at Union on Saturday, and at Christian Brothers on Monday night, winning both.

Burkhamer came to UWF in 2015, taking over a team that had won only seven games the previous season.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort may not be headed for trial on money laundering and conspiracy charges until late autumn. The judge in his case expressed puzzlement over some of the legal positions he has taken.

Lawyers for Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller have turned over thousands of pages of material to Manafort and his former business partner Richard Gates, a process that prosecutors said is continuing.

But at least part of the holdup in the case is Manafort's own making, Judge Amy Berman Jackson said.

When I went to the imaging center for my regular mammogram last year, the woman behind the desk asked me if I'd like to get a "3-D" mammogram instead of the standard test I'd had in the past.

"It's more accurate," she said.

What do you say to that? "No, thanks, I'd rather have the test that gets it wrong?" Of course, I agreed.

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