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LeBlanc Recounts Alzheimer's Diagnosis; Life Before

As part of National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, we are taking some time to get to know Brian LeBlanc of Pensacola, who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in October of last year. When we first met LeBlanc, he talked about why he wanted to share his story and the extensive outreach that he does - on twitter and through his blog - and in speaking to groups on behalf of the National Alzheimer’s Association and University of West Florida Center on Aging. When asked about how he’s...
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Photo via Flickr// Tom Gill /

Handling Stress A Key To A Happy Holiday


Unemployment Down In NWFL, Statewide

The Pensacola metro area’s unemployment rate dropped from 5.5% in September, to 4.8% last month, according to the Department of Economic Opportunity. 3,900 new jobs were added in the Pensacola area during that span, part of the nearly 37,000 statewide – the highest one-month total for jobs added in a decade. DEO Director Jesse Panuccio says they’re spread out over a number of sectors. “Education/Health Services added 1,100jobs; Professional and Business Services added 900 jobs, Trade...
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Is there ever a time when cool trumps science?

It's a question that becomes relevant when you consider NASA's plans to put a helicopter drone on an upcoming rover mission to Mars.

Where's This Painting? 30 Years After Its Theft, Nobody Knows

54 minutes ago

Thirty years ago, one of the most valuable paintings of the 20th century vanished. It wasn't an accident and it wasn't some elaborate movie heist. It was a simple theft — and it's still a mystery.

It was the day after Thanksgiving, 1985. Staff at the University of Arizona Museum of Art in Tucson were getting to work, just like any other day.

"It was almost 9:00 o'clock so the museum was gearing up to open the doors," says museum curator Olivia Miller. "The security guards opened the doors for one of the staff members, and two people followed behind."

Urban foraging might call to mind images of hipsters picking food out of the trash.

But one group in Massachusetts eats only the finest, freshest produce. The League of Urban Canners harvests fruit from trees in Cambridge and Somerville and turns it into jam.

Sam Christy, a local high school teacher, started the league four years ago.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

When his cellphone rang Friday night, on Nov. 13, Joel Touitou Laloux didn't answer. The sun had long since set, the Jewish Sabbath was under way, and he doesn't use electronics on Shabbat.

He recognized the number. One of his sons was calling from Paris. Laloux, who managed the Bataclan theater for decades until he and his family sold it in September, now lives in Ashdod, a coastal city in southern Israel.

Finally, after his son's number flashed three or four times, Laloux answered.

This time of year we tend to do a lot of writing about food. Usually we describe delicious dishes that remind us of home and our favorite family traditions, but there's something missing from that conversation: the tale of the kitchen disaster, the wreck, the unsalvageable mess for which the only remedy is take-out.

To fully appreciate the special anguish that is a home-cooked meal gone wrong, we've asked three people with particular knowledge in this area to tell us about their worst-ever kitchen debacles.

For high school students looking to choose a college, grade point averages and test scores may weigh heavy on their minds. But campus atmosphere may not be far behind given recent demonstrations on college campuses across the country.

Students at the University of Missouri's flagship campus in Columbia were the forefront of a wave of protests over racist incidents and the reaction of school officials. For some high school students, those protests make racial relations factor highly in their college search.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



A new report by UNICEF warns that the number of child brides in Africa could more than double to 310 million in the next 35 years.

Though the rates of child marriage are on the decline in most parts of the world, the number of girls married as children in Africa is expected to increase by 250 percent by the year 2050.

At that point Africa would surpass South Asia as the region of the world with the largest number of young women who were married before their 18th birthday, the report says.

Friendship is unlike any other relationship in a person’s life. It can be difficult to define and may carry different meanings for different people. Two friends may describe the degree of their relationship in totally different ways.

While family bonds are typically considered unconditional, friendships are voluntary and thus subject to being set aside when people enter adulthood and “more important” events arise.


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Gulf Power

Gulf Power Is Sharing Solar

Gulf Power is clearing a path for you to power your home with solar power. The Gulf Solar Energy Share program has been presented to the Florida Public Service Commission for approval. The program will give Gulf Power customers the opportunity to power their homes completely with solar energy. "This will actually be a new, more affordable way for our customers to participate in solar without the expense of rooftop solar panels, said Natalie Smith, a Communications Specialist with Gulf Power....
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