Mark Hainds

'La Frontera' Traces Local Man's 1,100 Mile Walk Along Border

The documentary film “La Frontera” chronicles Mark Hainds 2014 extraordinary journey alone, and on foot, along the Mexico American border. Joe Vincenza tells us more about the movie, and the man. The Mexico America border has been of particular attention lately, as an issue in the 2016 presidential election. But for Mark Hainds, the subject of the documentary film “La Frontera”, his fascination with the border began long before the election. “It’s always been works of literature, it seems...
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Outside the federal courthouse in Portland, Ore., supporters of Ammon Bundy and his militia followers dress in traditional cowboy attire and wave American flags at passing cars. Some even ride a horse up and down the busy city sidewalk.

A block away, Jarvis Kennedy watches all of this and rolls his eyes.

"We don't claim to be victims, but we were," he says.

Smartphone chip maker Qualcomm Inc. has agreed to buy NXP Semiconductors for $38 billion. The agreement allows Qualcomm, which makes chips for Apple and Android, to become the top seller of semiconductors for the car business.

Qualcomm's core business is in processors and wireless chips for smartphones. The deal allows the San Diego-based company to reduce its dependence on smartphones, a huge business that has reached a plateau.

Scientists have long suspected that the common swift remains airborne for extraordinary amounts of time during its annual migration.

Now, a team of scientists in Sweden has proved that these birds fly for tremendously long periods of time. They affixed data loggers onto a total of 19 of the master fliers in 2013 and 2014, and recaptured the birds months or years later. Researchers found that the birds can spend almost their entire 10-month nonbreeding period on the wing.

The federal government, filled with creaky computer systems that are a poor match for the cybersecurity threats that agencies face from an array of hackers, criminals and foreign governments, is hoping for a multibillion-dollar capital infusion to modernize its IT infrastructure.

A police operation is underway in North Dakota to remove protesters from land owned by pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners.

The Associated Press reports several people have been arrested.

As the host of the Peabody Award-winning series Parts Unknown, Anthony Bourdain has visited conflict zones like Beirut, Congo, Gaza and Libya — places his CNN colleagues routinely cover. But Bourdain is clear that he doesn't want to be mistaken for a journalist.

When I was 6 years old, my mom woke up, got out of bed and crashed to the floor. That's when she figured out half her body was paralyzed. The left side. Right down the middle, like a paper doll folded at the center. She made it to the phone, called a guy she'd just started dating, asked him to take her to the hospital.

When he rang the bell, my mom had to drag the limp half of her body backward, down the stairs, to open the door for him. She told me later, the guy was so scared that during the car ride to the ER he farted the whole time. Couldn't stop. They broke up after that.

Twitter shocked the Internet Thursday with a farewell to Vine: "In the coming months we'll be discontinuing the mobile app."

We could have seen it coming. The six-second looped-video site hasn't gotten much love from Twitter, which is grappling with self-reflection: another quarter of losses, layoffs of 9 percent of the staff, constant rumors of a potential sale.

It's been a brutal forest fire season in California. But there's actually a greater threat to California's trees — the state's record-setting drought. The lack of water has killed at least 60 million trees in the past four years.

Scientists are struggling to understand which trees are most vulnerable to drought and how to keep the survivors alive. To that end, they're sending human climbers and flying drones into the treetops, in a novel biological experiment.

Twitter has released its third quarter earnings and, along with them, announced the layoff of around 350 employees.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, about why Twitter is struggling and what might be next for the company.


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