Alzheimer's Association

alz.org / Alzheimer's Association

There are more than 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S. and that number is projected to reach 16 million by 2050.

Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s and it is the only leading cause of death that cannot be prevented, slowed, or cured.

However, thanks to national and international awareness efforts, a lot more is known about the disease and momentum has been building in the field study.

Alzheimer's Association

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the disease has become a public health crisis in the U.S.  

For National Alzheimer's Awareness Month, WUWF  is taking a closer look at the prevalence of the disease and the toll it takes on the brain of an individual who's been diagnosed with it.

University of West Florida

A professor at the University Of West Florida is the new Alzheimer’s Association Ambassador for the Florida Panhandle. "I had never been involved in political advocacy before and it sounded like a good opportunity." said Dr. Daniel Durkin, an assistant professor of Social Work at UWF with a specialty in Gerontology.  

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

Since his diagnosis of early on-set Alzheimer’s in 2014, Brian LeBlanc of Pensacola has been sharing his personal journey with the disease. In the past two years, his local advocacy has reached an international level. 

“Alzheimer’s Advocacy is, is my, my job,” said LeBlanc after last month’s Covenant Care “Walk For Alzheimer’s in Pensacola. “It’s the best job I’ve ever had that I don’t get paid for.”

LeBlanc was one of the featured speakers, and was set to do the same thing at an event in Niceville the next day, his ninth such event of the year.

Brian LeBlanc

Since November of 2015, we’ve been getting to know Brian LeBlanc of Pensacola. He has been diagnosed with early on-set Alzheimer’s. Now in his mid-50's, he has known about his condition for a little over a year now. As we continue our conversation, we focus on how the disease has impacted his daily life and how he’s dealing with it.

“Being this is radio, you can’t see what I’m doing right now, but I’m holding up my cell phone,” said LeBlanc. “That’s my constant companion.”

According to LeBlanc, his phone tells him everything, even when to eat.

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

As part of National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, we are taking some time to get to know Brian LeBlanc of Pensacola, who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in October of last year.

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

November is National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month. According to the Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 5 million people in the U.S., and up to five percent of those have early-onset Alzheimer’s.

In the first of a series of reports, we’ll take a closer look at early-onset Alzheimer’s and we’ll meet a local man, who’s trying to raise awareness by sharing his own story of life with the disease.

United Nations Photo

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and National Caregiver Month.  According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.  Based on the latest statistics for 2013, more than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s and someone develops the disease every 68 seconds.  Additionally, in 2012 there were 15 million caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia.