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ramusa.org

Volunteers are being sought to staff a two-day free medical clinic, sponsored by the Pensacola Remote Area Clinic on Saturday and Sunday, December 2-3, at Pensacola High School on Maxwell Street.

Organizer JoAnn VanFleteren at the Pensacola Remote Area Clinic says volunteers, both medical and non-medical, are needed. The event is divided into three core categories – dental, medical and vision.

“Dental – cleanings, extractions, and cavities,” VanFleteren says. “Medical – pap smears as well as annual checkups. And they will actually make glasses for people on the spot.”

reena.org

The High Holy Days are upon us, with Jews in Pensacola and around the world preparing their observances.

First up is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year 5778, which begins at sundown Wednesday and ends at nightfall on Friday.

“Rosh Hashanah is one of four biblical New Year’s, that’s a spiritual new year,” says Rabbi Joel Fleekop at Temple Beth-el in Pensacola – founded in 1876, it’s Florida’s oldest Jewish congregation.

NOAA

Governor Rick Scott’s being praised for his response to Hurricane Irma; but could that carry over to next year’s U.S. Senate race? 

Scott is gaining praise for his preparation and reaction to the storm, which has left millions of Floridians in the dark and dealing with floods. Hundreds of thousands of others took his advice and left for safer areas.

“This is a deadly storm,” Scott said as Irma battered her way through the Caribbean. “If you’ve been ordered to evacuate, you need to leave now. Do not wait – evacuate.”

Courtesy of Dr. John Worth

 

 

           During the evening of Tuesday, September 19, 1559, some 458 years ago, strong winds from the north heralded the arrival of a great hurricane in Pensacola Bay.  The storm was not the first to assail the bay, nor would it be the last, but the 1559 hurricane did manage to change the course of human history by destroying a fleet of Spanish colonial ships riding at anchor off the newly-founded settlement called Santa María de Ochuse.

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

In the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, dozens of individuals have been lining up locally to become American Red Cross volunteers. For some, it’s a first time experience, while others are refreshing their training.

Still others are already in the trenches, and loving every minute of it.

Meet the Hinds.

“My name is Kaffey,” said Kaffey Hinds, introducing herself.  “It’s K-a-f-f-e-y. And, this is my husband Lee.”

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority

Water, water everywhere in south Florida, but not a lot of it to drink. The Emerald Coast Utilities Authority is lending a hand, part of the assistance coming from the Florida Panhandle.

ECUA Executive Director Steve Sorrell says a mutual response team has been organized, acting on a request from the Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) for lift station and maintenance crews to help with that city’s wastewater system.

 Some years ago, small decorated, mailbox-like structures began to spring up in front of homes in our area, especially East Hill. Called free or sharing libraries, they were designed for people to share books.

It was a simple concept. Someone would put one up on the street in front of their house and stock it with books. Passersby were free to take a book or leave a book for others. The designs are as varied as the preferences of the builders, but usually include a glass front, and of course a hinged door to allow access while protecting the contents from rain.

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the American Red Cross of Northwest Florida has ramped up their recruitment and training of volunteers.

“Thank you all for coming,” said volunteer Sheila Mitchell, as she welcomed a group of prospective volunteers to the latest training session at the Pensacola office. “This is great to have this much of a turnout.”

Mitchell says losing her house in Hurricane Ivan is what drove her to become a Red Cross volunteer, which she’s done for the past three years.

tip-ser dot org

Sometimes major disasters like Hurricane Irma can make smaller mishaps like fires and car crashes seem small. But for the people involved, they are just as devastating and the need for help and comfort is immediate. That’s where the TIP program comes in. "TIP stands for the Trauma Intervention Program" said Cheryl Kulka, a volunteer with the TIP affiliate in Northwest Florida.

Gulf Power Company

As the remnants of Irma dissipate from Tennessee to the Carolinas, work is underway to restore power to 15 million people in parts of south Florida hit by the former Category-5 Hurricane. That includes help from the Panhandle.

More than 150 Gulf Power storm crew left Pensacola and Panama City early Tuesday morning for heavily damaged areas, after power was restored to 13,000 customers in Bay County that was knocked out by Tropical Storm Irma’s high winds.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Along with hosting concerts, home improvement shows, sports, and other events over its 32-year span, the Pensacola Bay Center is once again a shelter for those having fled Hurricane Irma in south Florida.

As of Monday morning, there were 286 people housed at the center’s shelter on the ground floor. Gloria Wiggins with the American Red Cross who is shelter manager, says that number is fluctuating.

“As people leave, they’re trying to go home,” said Wiggins. “Some of them are told to come back, because the weather is not safe for them to be traveling. So, we’re here.”

University of Texas San Antonio

Did piracy on the high seas play a role in developing the U.S. constitution and our system of courts? This year’s speaker at the Constitution Day celebration at the University of West Florida says aye. Now, to be sure, the annual UWF Constitution Day lecture usually doesn’t involve pirates and mutiny and privateers, but Dr. Matthew Brogdon, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at San Antonio and a UWF alum says he thought "Impressment, Mutiny, and the Seafaring Origins of the Federal Courts" made for a snappy title.

Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

As Hurricane Irma, still a strong Category 4 storm as of Friday evening, continues to barrel toward South Florida, state and local officials have ramped up efforts to help those fleeing the devastating storm.

For the past week, Florida Governor Rick Scott has been traveling the state urging all residents to be prepared for Irma. On Friday, he conducted briefings in Tampa, Ft. Myers and West Palm Beach. At more nearly 400 miles across, Irma will impact almost every part of the state. 

Local, state and federal officials are continuing to urge all of the state’s residents to prepare for powerful Hurricane Irma, which is set to begin affecting South Florida by the weekend. Government authorities are gearing up, too.

In briefings on Wednesday, Florida Governor Rick Scott called Irma a massive, possibly devastating storm, with extreme winds and a projected storm surge that could go for miles. He compared it to Hurricane Andrew, which was a Category 5 storm when it struck Florida in 1992.

"The storm is bigger, faster, and stronger than Hurricane Andrew."

John Dosh: "Right now the present official forecast doesn't show much impact for us up to the end of the forecast period, which is typically five days, and looking at the information the hurricane center is putting out in long term modeling, it is looking like it should continue the trend of moving up through the peninsula of Florida and providing very little impact for the panhandle other than some gusty, notherly winds. So basically, at this point, we are just monitoring and trying to prepare for any Floridians who are fleeing from the peninsula who we might be able to help."

University of West Florida alum Marzia Ransom has created a unique, large scale painting that is her interpretation of a Greek epic poem. The painting is on display in The Art Gallery at UWF.

Since the beginning of July, Ransom, a University of West Florida alum, has been painting a 32-foot long, 4-foot tall frieze in The Art Gallery at the UWF. The frieze is her interpretation of Homer’ Greek epic poem, the Odyssey through the female perspective.

Two Men and a Truck

Two Men and a Truck’s Pensacola office is joining with "Truck 4 Texas," in taking supplies to flood victims in east Texas. The items were collected in part by students at local Catholic schools. 

The idea began with an eighth grade student at St. Paul’s Catholic School in Pensacola. Matt Knee, the Executive Director of Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida, says it mushroomed from there to four other schools.

Linda Dunwoody / Sacred Heart Health System

The Pensacola community now has a new option for end of life care for seriously ill patients and their families with the opening of the Covenant Care Inpatient Hospice Center at Sacred Heart Hospital.

“When you look around, all I can say is wow,” said Covenant Care President and CEO Jeff Mislevy, referring to the new hospice center and the crowd of supporters gathered for the recent ribbon cutting.

cdc.gov

Escambia County’s first case of West Nile virus is now confirmed, prompting reminders about how to protect yourself from the disease.

As is the practice, the patient is not being identified – other than they’re an Escambia County resident. The Florida Department of Health-Escambia has issued a mosquito-borne illness advisory, for what Health Director Dr. John Lanza calls an “endemic.”

As it begins its trek through Louisiana, Tropical Storm Harvey is being felt across the Florida Panhandle and south Alabama.

Rain and plenty of it, compliments of Harvey, is forecast to inundate the area at least through Thursday across southeast Mississippi, southwest Alabama and northwest Florida.

“We’ve already received in the Pensacola Metro four to six inches; we’ve seen a couple of isolated gauge reports of seven inches,” says meteorologist Jason Beaman at the National Weather Service in Mobile.

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