Urban Development

Ciclovia means 'bikeway' is Spanish and 'bike path' in Portuguese. It also means a lot of people will be out biking and walking and skating through a five miles of road in downtown Pensacola Saturday. Sally Rosendalh is one of the co-founders of Pensacola Open Streets, the people bringing Ciclovia to Pensacola.

IHMC

One of my favorite aspects of living at Pensacola Beach over the last year was how easy it was to get around on foot or bicycle. Restaurants, shops, bars and recreation are all within easy reach, and the bike path makes walking and biking safe and easy.

My wife and I recently moved into East Hill, and were pleased to discover the same.

There’s no separate bike path in East Hill, and we have found a surprising  number of blocks with limited, or even no, sidewalk. But for a densely populated neighborhood it is remarkably easy, and safe, to navigate without a car.

Could Rethinking Development Mitigate Flood Damage?

Jun 11, 2014
City of Pensacola

When it comes to shaping cities and neighborhoods, since the late 1940s, urban developers have catered developments to the invention and expansion of the automobile. Cars allowed people to spread out more and paved the way for urban sprawl. This concept of spreading everything out, in turn can result in “pressure that pushes us into more marginal areas for development than we would otherwise.” That’s according to Christian Wagley, a local environmental advocate and green building consultant. What happens when development occurs in those “more marginal areas”?