pensacola state college

arc-gateway.org

Pensacola State College and Arc Gateway are beginning PALS – Program for Adult Learning and Support – a two-year post-secondary program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

About 40 students will make up the inaugural PALS class, including Cameron Northup, who was born with Down syndrome.

“I do not want to go into detail about my disability,” said Northup. “I want to talk about my abilities.”

Photo via Flickr//David Yu

Residents along the Gulf Coast will join much of the rest of North America early Wednesday, in viewing another “blood moon.” 

The event is the second in a sequence of four blood moons called a tetrad, which occur in six-month intervals. The first blood moon was last April 15. The last two will happen in 2015, on April 4 and September 28. The color of a "Blood Moon" comes from the refraction of the sun’s light through Earth’s atmosphere.

  On July 20, 1969, man became an interstellar voyager when Apollo 11 made the first of a half-dozen visits on the moon. 

It was 45 years ago when the world heard astronaut Neil Armstrong’s “One giant step for mankind” remark as he stepped down onto the lunar surface. Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first of a dozen Americans to walk on the moon and return home safely. A third astronaut, Michael Collins, piloted the Apollo 11 command spacecraft in lunar orbit.

earthsky.org

There's a meteor shower on tap for this weekend, and it might even turn into a full-fledged meteor storm. But you’ll have to get up pretty early to watch it.

Between one and three o’clock Central time Saturday morning Earth will pass by debris from Comet 209P/Linear, which orbits between us and Jupiter. That dusty debris is what creates the meteor shower. The shower could as many as one hundred shooting stars per hour in the skies over northwest Florida.

Dave Dunwoody

About 300 people interested in working at ST Aerospace – either in Mobile or its operation to be built in Pensacola – came out in force on Thursday.

The line at Pensacola State College’s student center extended out to the parking lot when the doors opened at ten o’clock. They were quickly ushered in and through the process of filling out an application and speaking with an ST Representative.

Kay Forrest

An asteroid estimated to be three football fields in diameter flew by Earth earlier this week, missing our planet by “only” two million miles while traveling at roughly 27,000 miles per hour. Many consider the two million mile cushion a “close call.” Wayne Wooten, an astronomer at Pensacola State College, is not among them.

“Really far away,” says Wooten. “I think why this one got publicity when we actually had a bigger one come a lot closer just three or four days earlier was because it had been lost and then recovered. But this is not too unusual. These are small bodies.”

The Cashore Marionettes Perform In Pensacola

Jan 16, 2014
Matt Cashore

The Cashore Marionettes will perform in Pensacola this Friday. The “Life in Motion” show presents puppetry as an art form, with material designed for the enjoyment of adults and older children.

Joe Cashore has been performing with marionettes full-time for nearly twenty five years. His wife operates the lights and sound during his performances and assists with manipulating some of the marionettes. He constructed his first marionette more than fifty years ago, after he had seen one hanging in a store.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Manna Food Pantries will be serving up its seventh annual Fill A Bowl for Manna event this weekend.  The weather will be getting chilly again towards the end of the week, which means it's a great time to think about soup. 

New, Tougher GED Replaces Old Test

Jan 3, 2014
Chicago Tribune

As of Thursday, a new GED test is in effect across the United States. Those who didn’t complete the old GED will now have to start from scratch with the new one, which is significantly more rigorous.

Pensacola Museum of Art

The ‘Design of War’ exhibit at the Pensacola Museum of Art showcases posters, flags and other items produced during World War I and II. Several of the flags on display were produced during the first and second World Wars at Mare Island, a Navy base in California that was closed in the 1990s.  Dr. Patrick Rowe is a professor of art history at Pensacola State College and curator of the show.

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