pensacola state college

This week the WSRE Speaker’s series at Pensacola State College features a duo who helped create the 90s TV show Mystery Science Theater 3000. Trace Beaulieu and Frank Conniff wrote for and appeared on seven seasons of the program, then went on to create Cinematic Titanic, a touring show that also made fun of bad films. The pair will be appearing along with a grade B movie this Thursday evening. Here they speak about the renewed interest in the franchise.

Photo via Flickr// Nazareth College / https://flic.kr/p/rtrWbv

If you’re a newly-minted graduate, want to change careers, or just need a job, then you need to swing by Pensacola State College on Friday.

CareerSource EscaRosa is teaming up with PSC to host its annual Spring Job Fair, at the Jean and Paul Amos Performance Studio, Building 23. It’s free and open to the public.

Morgan Cole, an outreach specialist with CareerSource EscaRosa, says that attendees will be able to network with firms who are actively seeking talented individuals to fill open positions.

Pensacola State College

 The Veterans Upward Bound program, at Pensacola State College is helping area veterans go back to school. The mission of the VUB program is to provide eligible veterans with remedial coursework to prepare them to enroll in college. During a recent visit Project Director Rob Gregg provided a tour of their offices.

 In the computer lab where, we met Jarrell Diggs.  Diggs, an engineman, in the Navy, where he served for nine and a half years.
 

Photo via Flickr// Jeff Smallwood / https://flic.kr/p/dBeF91

This week marks the annual return of the Geminids meteor shower, which is visible from the Florida Panhandle, weather permitting.

The shower actually began earlier this month, with only a few meteors visible overnight. But Wayne Wooten, an astronomer at Pensacola State College, says things should ramp up by the start of next week. 

“The Geminids have been the best meteor shower of the year on average,” Wooten said. “The peak’s early Monday morning with maybe two meteors per minute coming out of the direction of the constellation Gemini.”

Pensacola State College

  The year 2016 is expected to be a year of challenges for Pensacola State College, both academically and financially.

When the state Board of Education approved a performance-based funding plan for higher education, it led to more than $600,000 being withheld from PSC’s base funding, which totals $34 million.

   Students and others looking for a job in Information Technology can hear from a variety of people in the field this Thursday evening in Pensacola.

Photo via Flickr// Freedom II Andres / https://flic.kr/p/9rxes5

On Sunday evening and early Monday morning, the moon will provide stargazers a triple helping of thrills.

First, it will be the fourth “blood moon” in the past year and a half. The eclipse is said to be the last of a "tetrad," four consecutive total lunar eclipses. The others were in April and October of 2014, and last April.

“Look outside – the sky is beautifully blue [Friday]. Little bitty dust motes are scattering little bitty light waves; the blues, the violets,” said Wayne Wooten, an astronomer at Pensacola State College.

Career Source Escarosa

Jobs seekers and employers will get a chance to mingle Friday at the 7th annual Community Job Fair at Pensacola State College. "I think everybody should show up dressed to impress, bring their resumes and be prepared for some employers to conduct on site interviews."  Morgan Cole is the outreach representative for Career Source Escarosa. 

Kadisha Onalbayeva

Pensacola State College is opening its Lyceum season this weekend with a special Kamerman Piano Series concert. The concert will feature a performance by Steinway Artist Kadisha Onalbayeva at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 30, in the Ashmore Auditorium, Building 8, on the Pensacola campus.

The presentation will honor the memory of Sid Kamerman, who was an award-winning sculptor. And, with his wife Jeannie at his side, he was a long-time supporter of the arts in Pensacola and along the Gulf Coast.

nasa.gov

After traveling across three billion miles of space the past decade, New Horizons is ready for its close-up – of Pluto.

If all goes according to plan, the probe will pass to within about 8,000 miles of Pluto’s surface, completing Man’s snapshots of the nine planets of our solar system. This mission is one of many firsts – the fastest spacecraft ever launched; the farthest destination ever explored, the first mission to Pluto in a binary planetary system, and the first mission in NASA’s New Frontiers program.

Photo via Flickr// Doug Jones / https://flic.kr/p/n8mPDx

Residents along the Gulf Coast will join much of the rest of North America, in viewing the first of two “blood moons” in 2015. This eclipse eerily falls on Easter and Passover weekend.

The event is also the third in a sequence of four blood moons called a tetrad, which occur in six-month intervals. Blood moons were seen last April and October. The two this year occur on Saturday and in September. But what makes it a “blood moon"?

arc-gateway.org

Pensacola State College and Arc Gateway are beginning PALS – Program for Adult Learning and Support – a two-year post-secondary program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

About 40 students will make up the inaugural PALS class, including Cameron Northup, who was born with Down syndrome.

“I do not want to go into detail about my disability,” said Northup. “I want to talk about my abilities.”

Photo via Flickr//David Yu

Residents along the Gulf Coast will join much of the rest of North America early Wednesday, in viewing another “blood moon.” 

The event is the second in a sequence of four blood moons called a tetrad, which occur in six-month intervals. The first blood moon was last April 15. The last two will happen in 2015, on April 4 and September 28. The color of a "Blood Moon" comes from the refraction of the sun’s light through Earth’s atmosphere.

  On July 20, 1969, man became an interstellar voyager when Apollo 11 made the first of a half-dozen visits on the moon. 

It was 45 years ago when the world heard astronaut Neil Armstrong’s “One giant step for mankind” remark as he stepped down onto the lunar surface. Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first of a dozen Americans to walk on the moon and return home safely. A third astronaut, Michael Collins, piloted the Apollo 11 command spacecraft in lunar orbit.

earthsky.org

There's a meteor shower on tap for this weekend, and it might even turn into a full-fledged meteor storm. But you’ll have to get up pretty early to watch it.

Between one and three o’clock Central time Saturday morning Earth will pass by debris from Comet 209P/Linear, which orbits between us and Jupiter. That dusty debris is what creates the meteor shower. The shower could as many as one hundred shooting stars per hour in the skies over northwest Florida.

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