Pensacola Fire Department

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

On a unanimous vote, the Pensacola City Council made history Thursday night, approving the first woman to lead the city’s Fire Department. WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody reports.

Ginny Cranor is a 20-year veteran of the department, and moves up from Battalion Chief.

“There have been other female fire chiefs in [Florida]; there was a female fire chief in Tallahassee that’s retired,” said Cranor. “But it’s a limited number. It’s an average of a little over 50 nationally from what I’ve heard.”

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Twenty years after first putting on the bunker gear of the Pensacola Fire Department, Ginny Cranor is set to make history.

Cranor is up for promotion from her current rank as Battalion Chief, to becoming the first woman fire chief in the department’s 208 year history.

“I feel very honored to be the first female that’s been chosen to do this,” said Cranor.

Her career in the fire services began after training as an emergency medical technician in 1993. She earned a nursing degree from the University of West Florida in 2012.

Laura Bogan, City of Pensacola

“BIGS with Badges” has landed in Pensacola – it’s part of a nationwide partnership between Big Brothers-Big Sisters and first responders.

The idea is to recruit first responders as mentors, which supporters contend will pay off for the kids, the mentors, and the community as a whole. Participating agencies include the Pensacola Police and Fire Departments, and the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office.

UWF Haas Business Center

Respondents to a survey to assess resident satisfaction with the City of Pensacola’s delivery of services and life in general were about as happy with things this year as they were in 2015.

The findings include 69.3 percent of those surveyed during a five-week period in October and November believe the City is heading in the right direction, and a 14 percentage point jump in those who say they’re “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the value of city services.

City of Pensacola

Matt Schmitt and Joe Glover are out as Pensacola Fire Chief and Assistant Fire Chief, respectively. They were fired Tuesday by Mayor Ashton Hayward after a three-month investigation of the department.

The Mayor’s action came after reviewing the 138-page report which he says outlines a number of instances that demonstrated what it terms as “a lack of judgment, poor leadership and contempt for the city’s Human Resources Department.

It’s time to “spring forward” Sunday morning, as most of the nation goes on Daylight Saving Time until November. It’s also a good time to make sure your home is a bit safer. 

Daylight Saving Time was enacted in the United States during World War I and repealed in 1919. It returned for World War II, and again ended with that war’s end. It was made permanent in 1966 and expanded in 2007. Any state can opt out of DST, as have Arizona and Hawaii.

studeri.org

Pensacola City Administrator Eric Olson’s out with some details about two issues going on at City Hall. One involves the Fire Department, the other deals with personnel policy.

City Administrator Eric Olson says the issues are not related, despite some media reports to the contrary.

“I like to look at it like there are two boxes – one is a box labeled ‘Investigation,’ and another is a box labeled ‘HR Manual,’” said Olson. “But that doesn’t mean that they’re in anyway linked. They just arrived on the same day.”

Pace Fire Rescue District

Fire chiefs and top administrators in the Pensacola Fire Department and Pace Fire-Rescue are on paid leave in two separate investigations.

Santa Rosa County officials confirm that Pace Fire-Rescue Chief Donnie Wadkins and Sec. Pat Watkins are under investigation for an undisclosed reason or reasons. Assistant State Attorney Greg Marcille confirms that the investigation has been ongoing for a period of time.

myescambia.com

Tuesday marks the kickoff of “Keep the Wreath Green,” a fire safety campaign involving Escambia County Fire-Rescue, Pensacola Fire Department, and departments in Santa Rosa County.

Each year on average, about 400 people die and 16,000 others are injured in holiday fires, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. Property damage totals around $1 billion.

That’s where “Keep the Wreath Green” comes in.

“It’s a method to put a visual indicator of fire safety during an important time of the year,” said Pensacola Fire Marshal David Allen.

An improperly used propane heater is believed to have caused the deaths of two adults and one child at a Pensacola residence on Thursday. That’s prompting reminders about the dangers of carbon monoxide.

When emergency responders arrived at the residence, Pensacola Fire Marshal David Allen says it appeared to be the carbon monoxide poisoning of nine-year-old Jaylen Sunday, who was outside with the adult male who called 911.