Pensacola City Council

Tamara Fountain resigned Monday as the City of Pensacola’s Chief Operating Officer, 11 months after accepting the position and after weeks of controversy.

A news release from the city says that Fountain is leaving to “pursue other opportunities.”

“After everything she’s been through, I saw the letter she sent to [the] City Council. You know, I think enough of it has taken its toll on her, and she was ready to move on,” said Mayor Ashton Hayward.

Pensacola Police Department

When it meets in regular session Thursday evening, the Pensacola City Council is expected to approve the promotion of David Alexander to Chief of Police.

Chip Simmons is retiring next month after 29 years in the department, the last five as Chief. In that post, he’s overseen significant reductions in crime year-over-year, and the lowest crime rate on record. The PPD also became the first in the Panhandle to equip officers with body cameras: ten of them to start.

Interest in the vacant two-acre property in downtown Pensacola known as “Hawkshaw” has gone from virtually zero to plenty over the past few weeks.

Pensacola’s Community Redevelopment Agency last year issued a request for proposals, or RFP, inviting developers to offer plans and a bid to purchase the property: about 20 years after the CRA acquired it.

Office of the Mayor

If Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward gets his way, those paid to lobby him, the City Council and other city staff would be required to register.

Besides their names and affiliations, the registry would oblige lobbyists to disclose their clients, and the subject matters they want to influence.

Hayward announced through his digital newsletter last fall that he wanted the adoption of such an ordinance. Three months in the making, the proposal is set to go before the City Council in the next few weeks. 

City of Pensacola

  Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward’s second term is underway, having been sworn in last month. As Hayward sat down with WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody, he touches on that victory, downtown renaissance, and the City Council.

DD: Mayor Hayward, you won re-election last month with 65% of the vote. What mandate does that margin of victory carry into your 2nd term?

City of Pensacola

The Pensacola City Council met in special session Tuesday, electing new leadership and overseeing the swearing-in of Ashton Hayward to a second term as Mayor.

The new-look City Council features Andy Terhaar as President and Larry B. Johnson as Vice President for the coming year. Terhaar was selected on the third ballot, fending off challenges from outgoing president Jewell Cannada-Wynn and Charles Bare.

Alan Gray

The Pensacola City Council and Escambia County Commission hosted a stormwater symposium Friday morning, with both promising to cooperate on ways to control flooding. The session was held before a packed room at the Pensacola Bay Center.

Torrential rainfall in late April totaled 27 inches in the Pensacola area in a 24-hour period. The resultant flood caused massive damage to roadways – including four parts of Scenic Highway that were washed out. Flooding also swamped some businesses downtown.

Mikaela Sheldt

Ten scientists from Florida universities are asking Gov. Rick Scott to talk with them about climate change and the impact human-induced global warming will have on Florida. 

Scott, when running for Governor in 2010 initially denied the impact of human-induced global warming, saying that he’s not convinced that there's any man-made climate change. He has since been reluctant to engage on the issue.

Brian Spencer

Pensacola City Councilman Brian Spencer ran his fifth Boston Marathon on Monday. After the race he spoke with WUWF's Bob Barrett on his cell phone from the finish line. They started with the atmosphere at the start of the race.

Brian Spencer says, "Absolutely celebratory and at the same time solemn... more than 30,000 people observed a moment of silence."

On running by the blast site:

"I wanted to focus on the families and the victims who were affected by this event. I think I did that."

On the atmosphere of the run:

Charles Bare

Citing what he sees as a need to restore the separation of powers in city government, Pensacola City Councilman Charles Bare is proposing a number of changes to the five-year-old city charter.

The amendments from Bare -- who’s a candidate for mayor – would give the council the ability to set financial controls, including changes to the city budget, and in other ways re-determine the organization of city government. He refers back to the City of Hialeah’s charter – the basis for Pensacola’s.

Pages