Pensacola Bay Bridge

Skanska USA

  New York-based Skanska USA is a step closer to getting the contract to replace the current Pensacola Bay, also called Three Mile Bridge, that opened in 1960. 

Tentative approval was given Monday in Milton by a three-member committee of Florida Department of Transportation officials. At just under $399 million, Skanska bested four other firms. FDOT spokesman Ian Satter says it’s now on to the next step.

  New York-based Skanska USA is the low bidder for the contract to build the new Pensacola Bay Bridge. The official announcement is expected Monday morning.

At just under $399 million Skanska outbid Johnson Brothers Corporation by $69 million. Ian Satter with the Florida Department of Transportation says according to the formula used, Skanska is the apparent winner.

Florida Department of Transportation /

Florida’s Department of Transportation is mulling over the possible release of proposed plans for a new Pensacola Bay Bridge ahead of schedule

For now, the release of the five competing plans for the $460 million project is set for July 18 at FDOT’s Chipley office. Scoring of the plans is set for announcement July 7 in Milton. Neither date is sitting well with Gulf Breeze Mayor Matt Dannheisser, who says they reflect a lack of public input.

Plans to improve the Pensacola landing of the new Bay Bridge will be on display Tuesday evening.

The meeting at New World Landing downtown will introduce the project, go over the design process and gather public input. And, according to Ian Satter at the Florida Department of Transportation, clear up any confusion.

“This meeting is for the U.S. [Highway] 98 at Bayfront Parkway at 17th Avenue intersection,” Satter says. “It has nothing to do with the Pensacola Bay Bridge project. This is a completely separate study that we’re conducting.”

Three major bridge projects in the Pensacola area are underway, including replacement of the 56-year-old span linking Pensacola to Gulf Breeze.

Construction began last September on two of the projects. Ian Satter at the Florida Department of Transportation says one involves the widening of, and improvements to, the Escambia Bay Bridge on Interstate-10.

Google Maps

Travelers driving through the Pensacola area are advised to use caution, when approaching and going through a pair of major bridge projects.  

Work on the Escambia Bay Bridge on Interstate-10 began last week, at a cost of $38.6 million.

“[Construction] probably will last about nine months; there will still be two lanes of traffic in that area, they’ll just be a traffic shift,” said Ian Satter at the Florida Department of Transportation in Quincy.

The Florida-Alabama Transportation Planning Organization (TPO) hosted a series of public workshops this week on the 2015 Transportation Project Priorities. The sessions provided an opportunity for residents to help determine a transportation game-plan for the area over the next 25 years.  


President Obama’s announcement Wednesday that bridge replacement would be accelerated under a new transportation plan includes one local project.

Speaking in Tarrytown, New York, Obama pointed to that city’s Tappan Zee Bridge replacement project – which is ahead of schedule -- as an example. And now, the President wants to broaden the list of such projects to be placed on the fast-track.

Residents and local officials gathered at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Pensacola Tuesday, for a look at the proposed new bridge over Pensacola Bay.

Representatives from the Jacksonville-based consulting firm Reynolds, Smith and Hills unveiled the most current plan using the so-called west-central corridor to the Project Advisory Group -- 14 members representing local government, business and residents.

Ian Satter with DOT says the new bridge would feature some major changes – both aesthetic and practical -- from what’s now on the 54-year-old span.


Local and state leaders gathered at Pensacola City Hall in late January, and received some good news on the future of transportation infrastructure in the Florida Panhandle in general, and one bridge in particular.