Offshore Inland


Houston, Texas-based DeepFlex is busy these days at the Port of Pensacola on two fronts: paying off liens against the project, and moving forward with building its facility to make underwater pipe for the oil and gas industry.

In June, DeepFlex secured emergency funding through its parent company in Brazil. One factor in the slowdown has been oil prices dropping to or below 40 dollars per barrel. But Port Director Amy Miller says construction is inching ahead with a small crew that’s enclosing the building.

The American Association of Port Authorities is sponsoring a program for port and maritime industry professionals, which will focus exclusively on energy projects. And this first-ever meeting is at Pensacola Beach.

Hosted by Port of Pensacola Director Amy Miller, the conference on Tuesday and Wednesday will explore the benefits and challenges of investing in various types of energy-related commerce.

Two hundred jobs are being created through a major manufacturing facility to be built at the Port of Pensacola. 

Mayor Ashton Hayward kicked off the announcement, with a number of business leaders and elected officials sitting under a tent and battling a swarm of gnats near Commendencia Slip. The City Council approved a lease agreement in March, which was executed in May – opening the door for the project.

Offshore Inland

A Norwegian-based company has reached agreement with the City of Pensacola, to lease a warehouse at the Port downtown. Offshore Inland is no stranger to the Gulf Coast, with facilities in Mobile, Galveston and Port Freeport, Texas; Port Fourchon, Louisiana and Dos Bocas, Mexico. The firm plans to spend up to 12 million dollars to build the Pensacola operation.

The Offshore Inland facility is projected to generate $250,000 in annual revenues. About 100 high-wage jobs will be created, handling sub-sea exploration vessels, and making flexible pipe on property adjacent to the port.