National Weather Service

Northwest Florida and south Alabama will remain in the summer swelter through at least this week. Work is underway to protect those at most risk from excessive heat.

The National Weather Service in Mobile has issued a heat advisory for Monday and Tuesday, which is expected to be extended for at least the remainder of this week.

Photo via Flickr// John Lillis

With summer heating up, the number of senior residents needing help to stay cool and safe are going up.

Joe Maniscalco at the National Weather Service in Mobile says a current trough of low pressure over Louisiana that’s keeping temperatures around normal for this time of year will give way to an upper ridge of high pressure approaching from the Atlantic in the next few days. As the ridge builds, the central Gulf Coast will also see a rise in temperatures.

Northwest Florida and south Alabama are bracing for another round of frigid temperatures. Residents are urged to take steps to protect themselves, including caution when heating their homes.

Two more winter storms are again targeting the Northeast with snow later this week – think of them as Valentine’s Day storms to chill the heart.

“You have a big area of cold, high pressure behind each one of them,” said Don Shepherd, a forecaster at the National Weather Service in Mobile. “And it just reinforces the dry, northerly cold flow that we have over the area.”

Temperatures in the Florida Panhandle are heading south this week, with a hard freeze and single-digit wind chills expected by Thursday morning.

A big dip in the Jet Stream is enabling a dome of frigid air to slide out of western Canada southward, says Dave Eversole at the National Weather Service in Mobile. That’s expected to drop temperatures to about 20 degrees below normal in northwest Florida and south Alabama.

“We’re going to see teens for most of the area Wednesday night,” said Eversole. “Highs on Thursday probably just in the lower 40s for much of the area.”

With temperatures forecast to hover around the 40 degree mark Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, cold weather shelters have opened in Pensacola and Milton.

Brian Nall, the Pastor at Ferris Hill Baptist Church, says they’ve been opening the church’s doors for seven years when the weather turns frigid. He says the shelter is a part of their larger Benevolence Ministry.

Officials in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties joined the rest of the Florida Panhandle in late January, in bracing for a rare taste of winter precipitation.

A winter storm warning was put into effect for the western Florida Panhandle, as moisture from the Gulf of Mexico joined forces with a major blast of Arctic air. Dave Eversole at the National Weather Service, said that would mean sleet, freezing rain and possibly some snow.

  One week after the first taste of winter for northwest Florida and south Alabama, another, colder round is on tap for the next couple of days. Shelters are gearing up as the temperatures go down.

According to the National Weather Service in Mobile, a cold front is pushing through the area, bringing with it will push through our area later today. Forecaster Joe Maniscalco says this is an atypically cold air mass for November, for the central Gulf Coast.

  Any doubts that winter is approaching will be dispelled over the next few days and the colder weather is hanging around for the next week or so.

Temperatures across the Midwest and Plains are in the teens and 20s, with reports of snowfall amounts ranging from 10 to 16 inches. Steve Miller at the National Weather Service in Mobile says the chill is heading south later today and tonight.

The “Dog Days” of August are upon us, with a week and a half to go in the month and this weekend is expected to be an extra sultry one.

Florida in August is always hot, but Mother Nature is raising the bar over the next few days. John Purdy is at the National Weather Service in Mobile.

"Generally we're looking at high pressure systems, which keep the clouds away. That means more sunshine which heatens up the surface of the earth."

Carol Myers

Residents in the Florida Panhandle are assessing the damage from Tuesday’s storms. Action is underway on the local and state levels to deal with more than 20 inches of rainfall in some areas.