Manna Food Pantries

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

The annual Stamp Out Hunger Food drive is set for tomorrow (Saturday) and people are being asked to leave a bag of nonperishable food items by their mailbox so letter carriers can collect them.

People are being asked to leave nonperishable food items in bags at their mailboxes this Saturday. Pasta, Tuna, Peanut butter, canned meats, beans and other packaged foods are needed. Thursday morning in downtown Pensacola, a rally was held to kick off the event.

Manna Food Pantries’ search for a new location has hit a road block. 

Last October, the food bank thought it had found its new home. Manna purchased a 4 and a half acre property from the Escambia County School District near North Hayne and Tarragona streets in Pensacola. This week, however, they are back to square one. De De Flounlacker, the Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries said that after taking a few months to evaluate the property they "have determined that it's just not the nest fit for Manna in the long run."

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Christmas came a week early for Manna Food Pantries this year as a well known family made a six figure gift to the non-profit.

Sandy Sansing, along with members of his family and auto dealerships delivered a big end of the year gift to Manna Food Pantries Wednesday afternoon. A check for $100,000.

Jay Bradshaw, the president of Manna's Board of Directors represented the board at the check presentation. He called it the largest gift to Manna since he has been on the board and "one of the largest the pantry has seen in the history of the pantry".

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

  The Annual Fill The Mayflower for Manna Food Drive is underway at the Cordova Mall in Pensacola.  De De Flounlacker, the Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries says this is Manna's biggest food drive of the year, and the non-perishable food items being collected now have to last through the spring.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

  Manna Food Pantries has taken the next step in finding a new permanent home.

If you stopped by Manna's long time location in Pensacola, you'd see the non-profit operating out of a few construction trailers in front of its warehouse. But that may soon be changing. De De Flounlacker, the Executive director of Manna Food Pantries, says the food bank has closed on a 4.5 acre parcel of land  at the site of the former Escambia County School District textbook depot between N. Hayne Street and N. Tarragona Street in Pensacola.

Bob Barrett

  Three months after losing its building and most of its inventory to April's flood Manna Food Pantries is set to resume service later this month.  Dee Dee Flounlacker, Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries announced that service will resume on Monday, July 28 just a few days short of the three month anniversary of the flood.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Manna Food Pantries and the Escambia County School District are working on a deal to move the non-profit onto the site of an abandoned school. The property is the site of the former J. Lee Pickens School on Hayne Street in Pensacola which has been vacant for 20 years. Dee Dee Flounlacker, the Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries says the deal is just for the land, not the building which was demolished last month.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Chris Rutledge, the President and CEO of Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union, stood in the sunshine at the Gonzalez Street headquarters of Manna Food Pantries Monday morning to present a check to help get the community organization back on its feet after last month's floods. The check was for over $146,000.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

When Governor Rick Scott came to Pensacola he spoke with many community and business leaders about recovering from last week's flood. He also spend a lot of time talking to Dee Dee Flounlacker, the Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries, the region's primary food bank.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

One of the biggest losses from this week's storm was Manna Food Pantries, who's office and warehouse in Pensacola were just about a total loss.  WUWF's Bob Barrett toured the damage at the Manna complex on Gonzalez Street and spoke about what it means for the future of Manna with Executive Director Dee Dee Flounlacker, who said they have lost "approximately 60 to 75 percent of our food".

On Manna's food storage:

The office and warehouse on Gonzalez street in Pensacola is the only place Manna stores their food. The only food still usable was stored on the higher shelves.

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