La Nina

At the midway point of the 2016 hurricane season in the Atlantic and Caribbean, forecasters are adjusting the numbers on the odds of an active season. They now expect the strongest season since 2012. 

Gerry Bell, lead forecaster for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, says the outlook now calls for 12 to 17 named storms, 5 to 8 expected to develop into hurricanes and of those, 2 to 4 Category-3 or stronger.


Forecasters predict a warming of the central Pacific Ocean known as “El Nino” will provide a break for weather-weary Americans this year.

The National Oceanic Atmospheric and Administration issued an official El Nino watch Thursday. In a typical El Nino year, there’s a stronger flow of wind at the Jet Stream level, and a stronger Jet Stream over the southern U.S.

Jeff Garmon, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Mobile, says that can increase the potential for severe storms: tornados, severe thunderstorms, squall lines, things of that nature.