El Nino


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is walking back its prediction in May of a 70% percent chance of a below-normal hurricane season for 2015.

The new outlook issued last week is a 90% chance of a below-normal year: the highest confidence level issued by NOAA since it began issuing seasonal hurricane predictions in 1998.

Lead Forecaster Gerry Bell points to a robust El Nino in the Pacific.


The 2014 Atlantic hurricane season is officially in the books, ending up with below average activity. But officials are reminding coastal residents not to let down their guard.

After numerous predictions had already been made, including from William Gray and his team at Colorado State University, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weighed in. It predicted 8-13 named storms; 3-6 hurricanes and of those, 1-2 major storms.


Forecasters predict a warming of the central Pacific Ocean known as “El Nino” will provide a break for weather-weary Americans this year.

The National Oceanic Atmospheric and Administration issued an official El Nino watch Thursday. In a typical El Nino year, there’s a stronger flow of wind at the Jet Stream level, and a stronger Jet Stream over the southern U.S.

Jeff Garmon, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Mobile, says that can increase the potential for severe storms: tornados, severe thunderstorms, squall lines, things of that nature.