2014 Pensacola Flood

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Three and a half years after its long time headquarters were heavily damaged in a flood, Manna Food Pantry has finally moved into its new home and is getting ready to welcome clients.

The new location is the former Pensacola Mill Supply building at 3030 North E Street. The building was gutted, the roof replaced and the outside given a fresh, new look. Inside, there is 23,000 square feet of warehouse space that is starting to fill up with food. Volunteers are already at work sorting through donations from the recent Fill the Mayflower campaign.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

On the morning of May First, 2014, Executive Director De De Flounlacker sat outside of Manna’s Gonzales Street headquarters with a folding table, some donuts and a pot of coffee. She said "early estimates right now are we've probably lost about 60 to 75 percent of our food." In addition to the loss of food, the buildings were unsafe and unusable. "Unfortunately", she said, "All pantry services are currently suspended."

Carol Myers

  Researchers at the University of West Florida are out with a first-of-its-kind study, assessing the health effects of the major flood that hit the Pensacola area in 2014. 

The Health Impact Assessment (HIA)  also involved the Florida Department of Health, and was funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Manna

  After a busy summer, Manna Food Pantries is looking forward to stocking up for the rest of the year and getting ready to move. It was late April when the food bank announced it had closed on a new home. Now, almost 6 months later, they are still in their old location on Gonzalez Street.

wuwf.org

Almost two years to the day when floodwaters submerged areas of Pensacola, Escambia County is out with its report on the flooding in April, 2014.

Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency for Escambia and 25 other counties in the Panhandle and Big Bend after storms dumped more than 20 inches of rain in some areas. While inspecting flood damage in the Pensacola area, he said economic losses in Escambia County alone could exceed $50 million.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

De De Flounlacker, the Executive Director of Manna Food Pantries, stood outside the food bank's flooded headquarters with a fold up table, a pot of coffee and a box of donuts on April 30, 2014. Their offices were flooded and unsafe, they had lost over three quarters of their inventory and their operations had been shut down indefinitely. "Here in our main pantry, it wouldn't be unusual to see 100 plus people receiving food every day. And that's all shut down right now.

Manna Food Pantry

  It’s been 18 months since floods severely damaged their headquarters, and Manna Food Pantries is still looking for a new home. 

Carol Myers//Dave Dunwoody

One year ago more than 20 inches of rain inundated the Pensacola area, washing out the vast majority of Piedmont Road near Roger Scott Tennis Center. Mayor Ashton Hayward returned to Piedmont Wednesday, as part of his "Recovery Tour.”

Hayward called Piedmont Road “Ground Zero” among the damage the storm inflicted on the area. The road was washed out from Tronjo Drive to Hallmark Drive by the heavy rain, and water escaping from a broken retention pond.

After a long delay caused by last April's flood The Institute for Human and Machine Cognition in Pensacola is set to finally begin a major expansion of its downtown campus.

Pensacola News Journal

With the flooding of late April still fresh on everyone’s minds, the City of Pensacola and Escambia County Commission hosted a stormwater symposium in mid-July, with both promising to cooperate on ways to control flooding.

Torrential rainfall in late April totaled 27 inches in the Pensacola area in a 24-hour period. The resultant flood caused massive damage to roadways – including four parts of Scenic Highway that were washed out. Flooding also swamped some businesses downtown.

NBC.com

Torrential rain – more than 20 inches in some places -- fell on the Pensacola area at the end of April. Both residents and officials scrambled to assess the damage, as we hear in this year-ender report from WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody.

Gov. Rick Scott came to town and declared a state of emergency in 26 counties – including Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton – eastward to Alachua County. 

Operation Photo Rescue

Pensacola area residents, whose cherished photos were damaged by the April 30, 2014 flood, are getting some help with digital restoration from the group, Operation Photo Rescue. Volunteers from OPR will be in the area this Friday and Saturday (Sept. 26-27), working out of Covenant Hospice in Pensacola from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.  

Operation Photo Rescue

Operation Photo Rescue (OPR), a U.S. not-for-profit organization comprised of a worldwide network of volunteers will be in Pensacola, FL on September 26-27 to digitally copy photos for anyone whose pictures were damaged by the recent flooding.

Hosted by the Covenant Hospice, OPR will be onsite at 2001 N Palafox St, Pensacola, FL on Friday and Saturday, September 26-27 from 9 am to 5 pm both days.