Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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A video of Florida Governor Rick Scott getting lambasted in a Starbucks went viral this week. Hillary Clinton’s struggle swiping her Metrocard in the New York City subway made news almost instantly. And, yesterday, President Bill Clinton was confronted by Black Lives Matter activists at a campaign event. Videos of that exchange quickly made the rounds online.

Travis Holcombe of KCRW joins us for this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions. He shares the glam rock of Philadelphia’s Sheer Mag, a new piece from Rostam (formerly of Vampire Weekend) that features sitar, and music from the faux-band Aquazul.

CEO Pay Takes A Dive In 2015

Apr 8, 2016

CEOs of major American companies took a hit last year.

A new Wall Street Journal analysis of chief executive pay at 300 public companies showed its worst decline since the 2008 financial crisis.

The slowdown is related to weak performance and accounting rules that put a crimp in pensions.

It’s kosher (a non wool-linen mix). It’s blue, white, red and gold. You can buy it as a prayer shawl. Or a skull cap. And of course…as a kilt. That’s right, a kilt. It’s the world’s first and only officially registered authentic Jewish tartan, now available online.

It’s perfect, according to the Jewish Tartan website, for weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, Bat Mitzvahs, Scotch Whiskey events, Scottish & Burns nights, and more.

What Happened To The Dinosaurs?

Apr 7, 2016

The extinction of the dinosaurs remains one of the world’s enduring mysteries, but a project getting underway off the coast of Mexico may provide some answers.

A team of researchers from the US and the UK will be drilling into the Chicxulub Crater, which was created when an asteroid hit the earth more than 60 million years ago.

Last month, the NFL admitted for the first time that football collisions are linked to brain damage. It’s something researchers have documented for years.

Now, new research shows a surprising way to possibly reduce the brain-damaging effects of head trauma: an ingredient in fish oil.

From the Here & Now contributor network, Texas Standard’s Lauren Silverman reports.

Country Icon Merle Haggard Dead At 79

Apr 6, 2016

Country giant Merle Haggard, who celebrated outlaws, underdogs and an abiding sense of national pride in such hits as “Okie From Muskogee” and “Sing Me Back Home,” died Wednesday at 79, on his birthday.

Haggard’s manager, Frank Mull, said the country icon died in Palo Cedro, California, of pneumonia.

A masterful guitarist, fiddler and songwriter as well as singer, the Country Music Hall of Famer recorded for more than 40 years, releasing dozens of albums and No. 1 hits.

When a listener of Here & Now contributing station WAMU posed the question: ‘Why does Washington D.C. have so many sirens?’, reporter Matt Schwartz decided to tackle the question.

Schwartz spoke to sound and acoustic scientists, as well as architecture experts, and ultimately came up with this verdict: D.C. does not have as many sirens as some other cities but its design – and physics – makes it seem so.

Medical schools at Yale, Harvard, Johns Hopkins and other elite institutions teach some of the most cutting-edge specialties, but some students and staff are complaining that a critical focus is missing: family medicine.

Melissa Bailey of STAT joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the omission.

“The People v. OJ Simpson” wraps up tonight. It was the first production of the new FX network anthology series, “American Crime Story.”

The drama has had viewers riveted, even though the case is over 20 years old and everyone knows the outcome. Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson speaks to NPR’s Eric Deggans about the show he calls “some of the best TV of the year.”

With the presidential campaign attracting so much attention, it’s easy to lose sight of another major political race taking shape: the campaign for the U.S. Senate.

Democrats are hoping they can win control of the Senate, where Republicans hold a four-seat majority. Among the key races is New Hampshire, where Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte faces a challenge from the state’s Democratic Governor, Maggie Hassan.

From the Here & Now contributor network, WBUR’s Anthony Brooks reports.

The massive data leak known as the Panama Papers has shown the role the shadow economy plays in Miami.

According to the documents, a number of foreign nationals linked to bribery, tax evasion or corruption bought up luxury real estate in the city, using shell companies to hide their identities.

The Miami Herald was among the news organizations that obtained the trove of documents from inside the Panamanian law firm, Mossack Fonseca.

Joseph Medicine Crow, a World War II veteran, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and revered elder of the Crow Nation, died Sunday at the age of 102.

Born in a log home near Lodge Grass, Montana, Crow became the first member of the Crow Nation to earn a graduate degree.

He was a Crow War Chief, having completed the required four war deeds while fighting for the 103rd Infantry in Germany during World War II.

The first boats of refugees and migrants have arrived back in Turkey from Greece, as part of a new — and controversial — deal between Turkey and the European Union that takes effect today. It is aimed at stopping the flood of people seeking asylum in Europe.

Under the deal, every migrant who reaches Greece illegally from Turkey after March 20 will be returned to Turkey, unless they qualify for asylum. However, for every Syrian turned back, a Syrian refugee who has been vetted is to be resettled from Turkey in an EU country.

At a writing conference in Boston on Saturday, renowned journalist Gay Talese said women writers of his generation seldom took on tough subjects, because they did not like to talk to strangers.

The remarks were in response to a question about female writers who inspired him (“Nora Ephron … Mary McCarthy … none”) and set off a social media firestorm.

The 84-year-old writer told The Associated Press on Sunday that he misunderstood the question.

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