Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

From Capitol Hill To The Silver Screen

Apr 28, 2016

In the new film “The Congressman,” actor Treat Williams plays Charlie Winship, a Vietnam-era veteran turned U.S. congressman. The plot is based on the real life of Robert Mrazek, who represented Long Island, New York, from 1983 to 1993. But, as he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, he always wanted to be a filmmaker.

The Commerce Department reported today that the U.S. economy grew at its slowest quarterly rate in two years, with the GDP expanding just 0.5 percent. Consumers are cutting back on spending, and businesses on investments, as Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine explains to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Six people have been diagnosed with measles in the Memphis area in less than a week. That’s more cases in just a few days than the entire country had seen so far in 2016.

There are also several outbreaks of mumps right now, including at universities in Indiana, Ohio and Massachusetts. At Harvard University alone, at least 40 people have been diagnosed in the last couple of months.

DJ Sessions: Improvising In Harlem

Apr 27, 2016

When you think of musical improvisation, classical music probably does not come to mind. But WQXR classical music DJ Terrance McKnight tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that there’s a lot of it going on right now, particularly in the classical music coming out of Harlem.

Apple’s stock was falling Wednesday, after the company reported its first quarterly drop in earnings in 13 years on Tuesday. Exxon Mobil also this week saw its credit rating drop for the first time since the Great Depression. And Chipotle reported a double-digit sales drop in the first quarter of this year. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what this week’s news means for these three companies.

While media giant Gannett tries to acquire the parent company of the Los Angeles Times and eight other daily newspapers, The New York Times says it will close its Paris editing and printing operations, eliminating 70 jobs. NPR’s David Folkenflik speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about news in the print journalism world.

Pittsburgh has more than 440 bridges in its city – more than Venice, Italy – earning it the nickname the “City of Bridges.” For many residents, the bridges represent the city’s historic ties with industrial production, engineering and steel.

But at least 20 bridges are now labeled “structurally deficient” by state and local officials, often due to age and weather damage. The Liberty Bridge, which once carried an estimated 54,000 vehicles a day, is now undergoing a three-year reconstruction estimated to cost almost $90 million.

More than 700,000 people have signed an online pledge to boycott Target, in response to its inclusive bathroom policy. The pledge was started by the American Family Association after Target last week published a statement saying “we welcome transgender team members and guests to use the restroom or fitting room facility that corresponds with their gender identity.”

Led Zeppelin To Climb The Stairway To Court

Apr 22, 2016

Led Zeppelin band members Jimmy Page and Robert Plant are expected in court on May 10 for the beginning of a trial to determine whether their iconic song “Stairway to Heaven” was partially plagiarized from the song “Taurus” by a little-known 1960s band called Spirit.

Though Plant and Page say they don’t remember hearing the song or seeing Spirit perform, the plaintiffs argue that the lack of memory is due to drug and alcohol use by the band. Plant and Page are requesting that their past drug use not be admissible in the trial.

Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the Jews liberation from slavery in Egypt, begins tonight. As Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst tells hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, it’s also a time to celebrate tradition, family and food. She shares some of her favorite recipes with us.

Uber reached a settlement in class-action lawsuits in California and Massachusetts, allowing the company to continue to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees.

The settlement calls for Uber to pay as much as $100 million to about 385,000 drivers represented in the cases, but it allows the ride-hailing company to avoid having to pay minimum wage or contribute to workers’ Social Security.

Saudi Arabia warned last week that it would sell its investments in the U.S. if Congress passes a bill allowing victims of terror attacks like 9/11 to sue foreign governments. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with business journalist Ali Velshi about the impact if Saudi Arabia followed through on the threat.

The Treasury Department announced yesterday that Harriet Tubman will soon become the first African-American to be on the front of a currency bill, and the first woman on U.S. currency in a century.

Tubman, who’s best known for her work as an abolitionist, and a so-called conductor on the Underground Railroad, will replace President Andrew Jackson, a slave owner and anti-abolitionist, on the front of the $20.

Remembering The Life And Legacy Of Prince

Apr 21, 2016

Pop superstar Prince, widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive musicians of his era with hits including “Little Red Corvette,” “Let’s Go Crazy” and “When Doves Cry,” was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist.

His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, told The Associated Press that the music icon died at his home in Chanhassen. No details were immediately released.

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