Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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Don't Like The Weather? Build A Mountain

Jun 2, 2016

The United Arab Emirates, one of the driest countries in the world, wants it to rain more, so the country is looking into building an artificial mountain.

When moist air rises up a mountain, it cools and forms clouds that could produce rain. The UAE has been manipulating the weather in the past few years, seeding clouds to produce more rain.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bruce Boe, vice president of meteorology at Weather Modification Inc.

When Neil Fachon was 20, he was diagnosed with a rare and incurable brain tumor, a cancer so aggressive it usually kills people within a year. In search of any and all treatment options, Fachon found an experimental therapy being offered in Texas.

But just one day into the treatment, the FDA ordered the doctor offering it to stop. So Fachon and his family decided to sue the FDA for the right to keep trying the experimental drugs.

The emphasis on standardized testing in schools across the country has many educators worried that some students aren’t learning the basics of reading and writing. That’s leading some districts to try creative methods to increase literacy, particularly for young students in low-income and minority neighborhoods.

Last year, countries around the world installed more renewable energy capacity than ever before. Investments in solar, wind and hydropower were more than twice as high as the amount spent on developing new fossil fuel sources.

China accounted for more than one third of the $286 billion spent on renewable energy development in 2015, according to a new report by REN21, a renewable energy think tank based at the United Nations Environment Program in Paris.

After weeks of scrutiny, the Transportation Security Administration took steps to limit delays at the nation’s airports over Memorial Day weekend. And while many holiday travelers were pleasantly surprised by the manageable wait times, staffing and budget problems at the TSA all but guarantee long lines will return.

Last night, the Golden State Warriors beat the Oklahoma City Thunder, securing a spot in the NBA finals that begin on Thursday. As usual, TV crews and photographers had their lenses trained on every basket in the 96-88 game, but broadcasters also drew on a relatively new piece of technology to help document the action.

Through a partnership with Intel, the NBA has been using 3D video to create 360-degree replays of slam dunks and other show-stopping plays. It’s the NBA version of the red carpet Glam Cam.

When a big dairy or meatpacking company comes into a Midwest city to build a factory, it doesn’t just bring in new jobs and industry. Farmers change what they grow, expand their herds, and buy new land. That can literally change the surrounding landscape.

Luke Runyon of Here & Now contributor Harvest Public Media reports on the expansion of a Leprino’s factory in Northern Colorado.

In the 1930s, a Japanese-American teacher in Hawaii came up with an ambitious plan: take kids who had just learned to swim in a re-purposed sugar cane ditch and train them to compete on an international level.

Julie Checkoway tells the story in “The Three Year Swim Club: The Untold Story of Maui’s Sugar Ditch Kids and Their Quest for Olympic Glory.” Here & Now revisits Meghna Chakrabarti’s conversation with the author from last October.

President Barack Obama marked this Memorial Day by placing a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. People are visiting the graves of their loved ones killed in action at cemeteries across the country today.

Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock went to the Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod last week, and has this report.

If you’ve been out on the roads this holiday weekend, you might notice that it’s getting harder and harder to find a tollbooth with a human being actually taking tolls. Toll plazas all over the country are going automatic. But just at the top of the Florida Keys, there’s a tollbooth with people inside.

Jenny Luna was with the Miami Herald when she reported this story for Here & Now contributor WLRN in Miami.

Netflix announced earlier this year that it’s planning to pour $6 billion into original programming in 2016.

As a new Adam Sandler and David Spade original film premieres tonight, NPR’s Eric Deggans tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti that the company’s definition of success is different for each project.

Charisma is a crucial component of a politician’s appeal to voters. But there’s more than one way to inspire confidence, or even adoration, among the audience of a political speech.

Voice scientist Rosario Signorello has studied how the current presidential candidates change their pitch and volume during public appearances. This week he presented that research at the Spring 2016 meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Facebook and Microsoft announced Thursday that they will work together on a project to build a new 4,000 mile-long cable under the Atlantic. It’s one of many high-capacity cables being built by tech companies, and shows an increasing involvement from Silicon Valley in the internet’s infrastructure.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more about the project from Michael Regan of Bloomberg Gadfly.

A traditional Native American healing ceremony is performed to promote a sense of wellness and to connect participants in mind, body and spirit.

The ceremonies can include prayer, chants and sacred objects and are often accompanied by music played on traditional instruments. But one healing ceremony in Phoenix has been reimagined for the digital age.

Jimmy Jenkins from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports.

Celebrating The Class Of 2016: Peace Odiase

May 25, 2016

This week, Here & Now has been speaking with 2016 college graduates about the biggest challenges they faced in school, and where they plan to go next.

Today, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Peace Odiase, one of two valedictorians at Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee.

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