Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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The Man Behind Atari's 'Secret Room'

Dec 21, 2016

The Atari video game console was king in the 1980s, and one of the most popular games was called “Adventure.” The medieval quest game was designed by Warren Robinett, but after he did not receive credit, he became angry and created a “secret room” or “Easter egg,” which hid his name within the game.

Tim Skoog from Here & Now contributor WBUR profiles Robinett, who revealed details about his secret message in “Adventure.”

As families gather for the holidays, some parents want their adult children to leave with more than new memories. They’re hoping to pass down antique furniture, collectibles and family heirlooms they feel have sentimental or financial value.

Climate scientists say polar bears have been showing up more frequently in villages along Alaska’s North Slope, looking for food as warming temperatures cause ice to melt in the Beaufort Sea.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Todd Atwood, research wildlife biologist with the United States Geological Survey’s Alaska Science Center.

Interview Highlights

On what makes polar bears come ashore

Russia is boosting security at its embassies around the world after its ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov, was assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art gallery in the capital, Ankara, on Monday.

A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin says the assassination, “benefits those who want to drive a wedge between Russia and Turkey” and derail peace talks for Syria.

The gunman who killed the Russian ambassador to Turkey at a photo exhibition in Ankara shouted in Turkish “Don’t forget Aleppo! Don’t forget Syria!”

The man then yelled: “Stand back! Stand back! Only death will take me out of here. Anyone who has a role in this oppression will die one by one.”

While stories of “rogue electors” have been swirling in the media for weeks, there’s no evidence to suggest Monday’s Electoral College votes will result in anything other than a Trump presidency.

NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about precedent, and how Russia’s meddling has affected what is normally a ho-hum process.

China has agreed to return an underwater U.S. drone Beijing seized in the South China Sea last week.

The Pentagon says it was conducting routine operations. But Beijing says the drone was linked to American efforts to contain China.

Laughing is something most people do every day, but chances are we don’t really understand why we do it.

Robert Provine, a neuroscientist and professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, explains the science of laughter to Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. Provine’s most recent book is “Curious Behavior: Yawning, Laughing, Hiccupping and Beyond.”

Do Tax Cuts Bring About Economic Growth?

Dec 12, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump has said he plans to cut taxes for individuals and corporations in order to stimulate the economy and create jobs.

Republican Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush also cut taxes with the same reasoning during their time in office. But cutting taxes doesn’t necessarily guarantee economic growth.

Cold temperatures and wet weather are spanning the country today after big snowstorms hit the Midwest, Pacific Northwest and other northern regions over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Dean DeVore (@DeanPSUpa), a meteorologist for AccuWeather, about the winter weather impacting the country, and what to expect later in the week.

Much of the post-game analysis among liberals after November’s election has focused on the working class, and the idea that Hillary Clinton did not do an effective job at reaching out to them.

But The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson (@DKThomp) says that Clinton actually did reach out to the middle class. She had a plan for coal miners and steel workers, for example, and she still lost.

President-elect Trump has said he will dismantle and replace the Affordable Care Act, and possibly privatize Medicaid — the insurance program for the very poor.

Several Republican governors say they’re putting their state’s Medicaid expansion on hold, as they wait to find out Obamacare’s fate.

Inside A Genetic Time Capsule For Seeds

Dec 9, 2016

Climate change has altered the growing season for many plants, including wildflowers. Observation has been the most powerful tool for scientists who study this shift. But it’s the plant’s seeds that may provide the most meaningful answers in the decades to come.

Change is afoot in Las Vegas.

A new casino resort opened this month and it’s catering primarily to Asian tourists. Its signs are in Chinese and English, and the hotel features authentic Chinese food. Two major hotel corporations are now charging for parking at their resorts.

[Youtube]

Two Tennessee teens are being held responsible for the wildfires that tore through the City of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and the surrounding areas of Sevier County. The fires killed at least 14 people, injured 176 and damaged more than 2,400 homes and businesses.

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