Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Tue October 14, 2014

An End to Flight Restrictions In Dallas

A Southwest Airlines flight Boeing 737 flies over Bachman Lake near Dallas (brentdanley/Flickr)

Today is the first day that Dallas airline and aviation officials will not have to contend with the federal law known as the Wright amendment.

For 35 years, the law restricted flights out of Dallas’ Love Field Airport, as a way to protect a fledgling Dallas-Fort Worth airport.

But it was allowed to expire yesterday, after a compromise reached by Southwest, American Airlines, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, and the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport.

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NPR Story
3:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

On Stage: Festival Seeks To Pass The Torch In Tango

A couple performing the Argentine tango at the Mesa Arts Center.(Garry Wilmore/Flickr)

On Friday we go “On Stage,” our look at what’s happening on the boards across the country.

This week, we go to New York City, where the Shall We Tango Festival is underway.

Polly Ferman, who is a touring pianist, created the festival.

She also created and directs the all-female tango group Glamour Tango.

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NPR Story
3:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

District Profile: A Cast Of Characters In Louisiana's Sixth

BATON ROUGE, LA - MARCH 17: Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards, 86, announces his run for U.S. Congress at the Belle of Baton Rouge Hotel on March 17, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Edwards spent eight years in prision following a felony conviction arising from the licensing of riverboat casinos in his fourth term as Governor. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

In this week’s installment of our District Profile series, we turn to Louisiana’s Sixth congressional district where nine Republicans (including a dance instructor who calls herself the Sarah Palin of the South), three Democrats (including an ex-con) and one Libertarian will be on the ballot to fill the seat of Congressman Bill Cassidy, who is running for Senate.

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NPR Story
3:36 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Washington Post App: Reversing the Paper’s Problems?

Pictured is the Washington Post building on August 5, 2013. (Win McNamee/AFP/Getty Images)

In the past several years, The Washington Post has suffered serious financial troubles and a seeming inability to assert its place in the digital world.

But David Carr of The New York Times thinks that The Washington Post is headed back to its Watergate-reporting glory days. He says that Jeff Bezos, the Post’s new owner and founder and CEO of Amazon.com, is giving the paper the resources it needs to thrive.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Airport Screenings To Begin For Ebola

The government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic.

Defense One tech editor Patrick Tucker tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that temperature screening and blood tests at airports are not an effective ways to stop people with Ebola from entering the U.S.

Tucker says the best method may be to do what we do stop terrorists from getting on a plane: background and contacts screening.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Witness To History In Atlanta

Marshall Slack has been a waiter at Paschal's for over forty years. He even waited on Martin Luther King, Jr. (Jeremy Hobson/Here & Now)

Paschal’s Restaurant in Atlanta is well-known as a political hangout.

Lore has it that Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders organized marches at the tables of the original restaurant.

“You had a mixture here at Paschal’s of not only so called movement leaders, you had regular folk as well who could intermingle with these people,” William Boone, a professor at Clark Atlanta University, said.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A Snapshot Of Monrovia As Ebola Takes Its Toll

MONROVIA, LIBERIA - AUGUST 15: A Liberian health worker speaks with families in a classroom now used as Ebola isolation ward on August 15, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. People suspected of contracting the Ebola virus are being brought to the center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, while larger facililities are being constructed to house the surging number of patients. The Ebola epidemic has killed more than 1,000 people in four West African countries. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Officials at the Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas say the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States, Thomas Eric Duncan, has died.

Duncan arrived in Dallas on Sept. 20 from Liberia and fell ill a few days later. He was sent home after an initial visit to the emergency room, but taken back to the hospital on Sept. 28 and has been kept in isolation ever since.

Officials say 10 people had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Senate Tracker: A Populist Democrat In Tennessee Threatens Incumbent

Gordon Ball (L) is challenging incumbent Lamar Alexander (R, no hat) in Tennessee. (Gordon Ball/Facebook; Lamar Alexander/Facebook)

In this week’s Senate Tracker, we turn to Tennessee, where Republican incumbent Lamar Alexander faces lawyer and Democrat Gordon Ball.

Bobby Allyn of WPLN, Nashville Public Radio, joins Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer to discuss the race.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Where Do Scientists Come From?

Where does scientific curiosity come from? Ari Daniel tries to find out. (Desirae/Flickr)

In science, a single question can be a powerful force.

It can open up an entire field of study. It can inhabit someone, shaping who they become. And it can jump inside other people, infusing them with a burning curiosity.

Recently, reporter Ari Daniel met someone captivated by these kinds of questions.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Explaining The Science Behind The Nobel Prize In Physics

A giant screen displays the images of (up, L to R) Japanese-born researchers Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamurawho received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 7, 2014 at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden. (Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images)

Three scientists won this year’s Nobel prize in physics for work which led to the creation of LED light. Their breakthrough was in creating blue LEDs. Other researchers had produced red and green LEDS, but you need all three colors to make the bright white light emitted from LED light bulbs.

Two of the scientists are in Japan one is American Shuji Nakamura at the University of California Santa Barbara.

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