Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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What if someone held an awards show with no red carpet, no fanfare, short speeches and it finished in under the projected running time?

There are still plenty of physical reminders of slavery today. Among them: hundreds of former slave cabins across the country.

A group called the Slave Dwelling Project sets out to identify these mostly small, dilapidated structures and bring attention to their preservation by inviting people to sleep in them.

For the past few days, NPR has been taking a look at the challenges facing the 30 million American adults who lack basic literacy skills.

In the final part of our series on adult education, Kavitha Cardoza of member station WAMU examines the economic and social impacts — not just on individuals, but on society as a whole.

Want to avoid catching the flu or your co-worker’s cold this year? 

Get some fresh air and wash your hands with soap and water, microbiologist Jack Gilbert tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Gilbert says we’ve created an urban world complete with air conditioning, filtration and windows that don’t open, leading to an environment of homogeneous microbes.

Add a healthy dose of bacteria from the outdoors, and you may just be fine. Getting a dog could help, too.

Update 4:23 p.m.: Law enforcement officials identify LAX shooting suspect as 23-year-old Paul Ciancia.

Update 2:49 p.m.: Union official: TSA agent killed in LAX shooting.

Update 2:20 p.m.: Police say 3 shot, including TSA agent, by gunman with semi-automatic weapon at LAX.

A suspected gunman was in custody Friday following a shooting at Los Angeles airport that left multiple people wounded and disrupted flights nationwide.

In novels such as “I Know This Much is True” and “The Hour I First Believed,” best-selling author Wally Lamb explores how a traumatic incident continues to reverberate years afterward.

The new foodie documentary “Spinning Plates” takes us inside three extraordinary restaurants and introduces us to the teams that keep them running.

And though the title might suggest the chaos of a busy kitchen, the documentary is warm and gentle, and anything but hectic.

NPR’s Trey Graham has this review.

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin says he’ll vote for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, making him the latest Senate Democrat to throw his support behind the law that would ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity in the workplace.

The bill is now only one vote shy of a filibuster-proof majority. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said earlier this week that he will push for a vote as early as next week.

As the weather turns cooler, Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst’s thoughts turn to nice warming soups.

And as she tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, making a simple soup base or stock is easy and a great way to get rid of leftovers.

“Everything that’s in the vegetable bin that looks like ‘uh,oh, if we don’t use it tonight we’re in trouble’ kind of feeling? Throw it into the pot, boil it up, make a soup.”

Company Aims To Go Beyond Credit Cards

Oct 30, 2013

Businesses frustrated by the fees they pay to credit card companies are looking at a European Union proposal that would reduce the swipe fees merchants have to pay every time a customer pays with a card.

The EU proposal calls for a cap on the swipe fees of 0.3 percent of the amount charged to a card — far lower than the 2 to 4 percent typically charged now.

President Obama has passed Ronald Reagan and is gaining on Bill Clinton, when it comes to how far the stock market has climbed during his time in office.

Under Obama, the S & P 500 has has jumped 120 percent. That beats Reagan’s 118 percent and is closing in on Bill Clinton’s 210 percent.

Is it fair to compare these presidents? And how much down the president have to do with the stock market, anyway?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson asks Roben Farzad of Bloomberg Businessweek.

Looking Back At NYC Outages During Sandy

Oct 29, 2013

One year ago today, Superstorm Sandy left part of Manhattan completely in the dark and without cell coverage.

One coffee shop owner, just opening a new shop, drew many new customers because he had a generator.

Jamie Rogers, owner of Pushcart Coffee speaks with Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson about those days without power and how his generator idea has paid off.

Indian software giant and outsourcing firm Infosys is expected to pay a $35 million fine to settle visa fraud charges — the largest fine of its kind in United States history.

The government is expected to announce tomorrow that a joint investigation by the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security found that the Indian company gamed the immigration system in order to increase company profits.

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