Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here and Now Home

As the weather turns cooler, Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst’s thoughts turn to nice warming soups.

And as she tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, making a simple soup base or stock is easy and a great way to get rid of leftovers.

“Everything that’s in the vegetable bin that looks like ‘uh,oh, if we don’t use it tonight we’re in trouble’ kind of feeling? Throw it into the pot, boil it up, make a soup.”

Company Aims To Go Beyond Credit Cards

Oct 30, 2013

Businesses frustrated by the fees they pay to credit card companies are looking at a European Union proposal that would reduce the swipe fees merchants have to pay every time a customer pays with a card.

The EU proposal calls for a cap on the swipe fees of 0.3 percent of the amount charged to a card — far lower than the 2 to 4 percent typically charged now.

President Obama has passed Ronald Reagan and is gaining on Bill Clinton, when it comes to how far the stock market has climbed during his time in office.

Under Obama, the S & P 500 has has jumped 120 percent. That beats Reagan’s 118 percent and is closing in on Bill Clinton’s 210 percent.

Is it fair to compare these presidents? And how much down the president have to do with the stock market, anyway?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson asks Roben Farzad of Bloomberg Businessweek.

Looking Back At NYC Outages During Sandy

Oct 29, 2013

One year ago today, Superstorm Sandy left part of Manhattan completely in the dark and without cell coverage.

One coffee shop owner, just opening a new shop, drew many new customers because he had a generator.

Jamie Rogers, owner of Pushcart Coffee speaks with Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson about those days without power and how his generator idea has paid off.

Indian software giant and outsourcing firm Infosys is expected to pay a $35 million fine to settle visa fraud charges — the largest fine of its kind in United States history.

The government is expected to announce tomorrow that a joint investigation by the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security found that the Indian company gamed the immigration system in order to increase company profits.

Pages