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A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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What Does The Electoral College Do?

Sep 13, 2016

Voters go to the polls on Nov. 8. But the 538 members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 19.

They’re supposed to follow the popular vote, but there’s always a chance a few might not. And what happens if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are tied?

Political scientist Kyle Dell joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young for a refresher on the Electoral College, and how members of Congress might break a potential tie.

Interview Highlights: Kyle Dell

On the Electoral College’s function

The world’s wilderness areas have experienced catastrophic losses in the past two decades, according to a new study published Friday in the journal “Current Biology.”

Comparing current maps with those from the 1990s, researchers concluded that more than 3.3 million square kilometers, or about one-tenth of the world’s total wilderness, has been lost, raising deep concerns about what effect that has on local economies and global climate change.

Stock markets in the U.S. were steady this morning, after closing at their lowest level since July on Friday.

The drop came after comments from Eric Rosengren, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston president, raising the expectations for a rate hike from the Federal Reserve later this year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Jill Schlesinger about what is rattling investors.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English about some of the stories that are gathering steam on social media.

Jury selection began this week in the federal trial of two former top aides to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who are said to have orchestrated the traffic jam at the George Washington Bridge in 2013 known as “Bridgegate.”

Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie’s former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, a Christie appointee to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, are charged with fraud and conspiracy for allegedly planning the lane closures as an act of retribution against Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, for not endorsing Christie’s bid for re-election.

Last night’s prime-time presidential forum was the first time Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were set to speak on the same stage. But talk afterward focused more on the shortcomings of the forum’s host, the “Today” show’s Matt Lauer.

NPR’s David Folkenflik examines what Lauer did and didn’t do last night, and how the moderators of the upcoming debates can take tips from his performance.

Apple’s iPhone is getting an updated home button and will come with water and dust protection.

Apple says the iPhone 7 is now force sensitive, so responses can differ based on how hard you press it. It’s similar to what Apple has done with a trackpad in a slimmer MacBook model last year.

Camera improvements include a new flash with four rather than two shades of color to match ambient light.

It’s one of several new features Apple is introducing at an event in San Francisco.

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will address the fight against ISIS, national security and veterans issues in New York tonight.

The Commander-in-Chief Forum will be simulcast by NBC and MSNBC and will feature questions from members of the military, veterans and military family members. It’s sponsored by Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young previews the event with NPR’s Phil Ewing.

The ITT Technical Institute, the nation’s fifth largest for-profit college, announced today that it is closing all its campuses, and laying off nearly 8,000 employees. ITT’s parent company blamed sanctions from the federal government for the closure.

Last month, the Department of Education banned the school from enrolling students who receive federal financial aid, which comprises a large portion of the school’s revenue.

The Range 12 wildfire in Washington State began July 30 and burned for days, blackening 176,600 acres of valuable habitat on the Hanford Reach National Monument. The land was set aside in 2000 by President Bill Clinton, and it’s home to desert species including the Greater Sage-Grouse, sagebrush sparrows and tiny burrowing owls.

Anna King of Here & Now contributor Northwest News Network took a look at what was lost — and what remains.

Thousands of protesters have descended on a quiet part of North Dakota, occasionally clashing with security personnel over plans to build an oil pipeline under the Missouri River.

Lawsuits are pitting Native American tribes and environmental activists against the Energy Transfer Partners pipeline company.

Amy Sisk, a reporter with Inside Energy, discusses the latest with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are preparing for what’s being billed as the marquee moment of the long campaign season: the first presidential debate, which will take place on September 26 in New York.

Trump spent Saturday visiting a black church in Detroit. The move was aimed less at trying to win over the black vote, but instead at cooling claims that he’s insensitive to minorities.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest news from the campaign trail with NPR’s Ron Elving.

Former Stanford student Brock Turner was released from jail Friday.

Turner served three months of a six month sentence for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in January 2015. The case set off a national outcry, with many arguing that the six month sentence was too lenient.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets an update from KQED’s Beth Willon.

Hurricane Hermine made landfall in Florida overnight, before it was downgraded to tropical storm status.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Hermine may be responsible for claiming the life of a man who died after he was hit by a tree. Forecasters say the storm most likely will cause flooding in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states.

This summer has been tough, with record heat, drought, floods and wildfires across much of the country. But in 1816, it wasn’t hot weather people endured. It was bitter cold.

The year came to be known as the “Year Without a Summer.” There was frost and snow all summer long, and it may have been a first taste of how a changing climate can affect peoples’ lives.

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