Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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Tennessee state Rep. Andy Holt refuses to back down from his decision to give away an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle, similar to the one used by the Orlando shooter, at a fundraiser this weekend. In fact, Holt says he will now give away two of them. He insists that the weapon, which is similar to the one used in Orlando, is not to blame for the massacre.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Holt, who represents three counties in the northwestern corner of the state, about his decision.

Far-right politicians in Europe are praising Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. French leader Marine Le Pen called it a victory for freedom. Dutch politician Geert Wilders called for a similar referendum for the Netherlands.

German politician Beatrix von Storch agrees. Von Storch tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that wanting to control one’s national borders isn’t racist or xenophobic, “it’s just normal.”

Women in the U.S. face many financial challenges beyond the gender wage gap, including saving enough for retirement.

In a View From The Top conversation, Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Ellevest CEO Sallie Krawcheck about how the company’s newly launched platform aims to help women better invest for their future.

See more in our View From The Top series

Interview Highlights: Sallie Krawcheck

On the gender investment gap

Mick Cornett, the mayor of Oklahoma City, grew up there and saw the city he now leads rebound from the 1995 bombing of the Murrah federal building. He’s the incoming head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which meets in Indianapolis this weekend.

In a conversation with Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd, Cornett weighs in on how a city recovers from a terrorist attack, and describes the crisis facing virtually every mayor in the U.S.: how to pay for repairs to crumbling infrastructure like roads and bridges.

Growing Diet Divide Between Rich And Poor

Jun 22, 2016

Economic inequality has been a central theme of the 2016 presidential race: the rich are getting richer, the poor are getting poorer, the middle class is shrinking. But diet inequality is growing, too.

Increasingly, wealthy Americans are eating healthier than poorer Americans. Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks to Anna Vlasits of STAT, the national health and medicine publication, about what’s behind the diet divide.

After six years of effort, House GOP leaders are announcing a new plan today that would replace the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act, if it is repealed. Meanwhile, a new analysis shows that the U.S. will actually spend less on healthcare in the near future than expected.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Julie Rovner, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, about where Obamacare stands now.

One hundred years ago, President Woodrow Wilson signed into law the National Park Service Organic Act, creating the National Park Service. On Aug. 25,  the Park Service will celebrate the centennial of America’s parks system. Leading up to the celebration, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson is talking to park rangers and officials across the country.

Why Should Americans Care About 'Brexit?'

Jun 22, 2016

It’s easy for Americans to see the Brexit debate as a British issue. But the personal finance website Bankrate.com says if Britons vote tomorrow to exit the European Union, European vacations will likely be cheaper, mortgage rates might fall, the stock market could drop, and it would be harder to find a job in Britain.

Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins talks to economist Diane Swonk about the impact of Brexit on Americans.

What is your opinion on the Brexit? Let us know in a Here & Now poll:

After a series of high profile sex discrimination lawsuits in the last 20 years, Wall Street firms have expanded diversity training and programs. However, Harvard Business Review reports that diversity does not seem to be improving, and that part of the reason may have to do with how diversity programs are conducted.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with HBR’s Curt Nickisch about what works and what doesn’t.

The Politics Of Silicon Valley's Elite

Jun 21, 2016

Apple CEO Tim Cook will hold a fundraiser with Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan next week, according to an article published by Politico. The news comes days after Apple’s decision to pull its financial and technical support for the upcoming Republican National Convention, citing previous inflammatory comments made by the party’s presumptive nominee Donald Trump.

California’s prolonged drought has led to millions of dead trees that could make tinder boxes of huge swaths of the state as it heads into fire season. But the American West isn’t the only place coming to grips with chronic drought.

The World Resources Institute mapped water stress around the world and found major regions of every inhabited continent have serious issues with water. Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets an overview of drought crises around the world from Betsy Otto, director of the World Resources Institute’s Global Water Program.

The United Kingdom votes Thursday on a proposal to leave the European Union. Last week, voters appeared to favor a Brexit for the first time since polling began on the referendum, but after the murder of MP Jo Cox, “Remain” is on top once again.

Nonetheless, economists are nervous that the move could have ripple effects for economic growth, trade and finance across Europe.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the economic implications of Brexit with Marcel Fratzscher, president of The German Institute for Economic Research.

This week, presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump once again called for a temporary ban on Muslims and suggested President Obama was sympathetic to terrorists. Presumed Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton called Trump’s ideas nonsense, and called for a national assault weapons ban. Her rival Bernie Sanders, in a video message to supporters last night, didn’t concede the race and didn’t endorse Clinton.

Former Green Party candidate and consumer advocate Ralph Nader says the two-party American political system creates “second class citizens” out of third-party candidates.

He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the flaws he saw in the Democratic primary, and says those who still blame him for Al Gore’s presidential loss in 2000 are “fact deprived.”

Interview Highlights: Ralph Nader

On which candidate he’s supporting

Millions of dollars are pouring into various funds to help the families of the victims and the survivors of the Orlando attack. Attorney Kenneth Feinberg has been in charge of several similar funds after other tragedies, including 9/11, the Virginia Tech massacre and the Boston Marathon bombings.

He’s been consulting on how to handle the Orlando situation, and talks about the situation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

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