Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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A Canadian podcast series features grown-ups reading things they wrote as kids.

All this week, we’ll hear excerpts from the series and today Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with the podcast’s creator and producer Dan Misener, as they listen to a bit of Caleb Beyers giving advice to the Prime Minister on nuclear disarmament.

Interview Highlights: Dan Misener

On how the podcast was born

While most of the attention on the impacts of fracking has focused on things like drinking water, air pollution and earthquakes, state regulators in Pennsylvania are working on another less-discussed, but no less serious, side effect of oil and gas development: forest fragmentation.

The recent Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act was a relief to the six and a half million Americans who receive subsidies to purchase health insurance. It was also a relief for the health insurance industry.

Recent attacks in North Carolina have heightened the negative public perception of sharks. But for 21-year-old Australian Madison Stewart, sharks are almost family.

Since she was in her early teens, Stewart has made it her mission to preserve and educate the world about the creatures she feels so passionate about.

As the Founding Fathers established the United States of America, they had their eyes on the future and they knew they were making history. But not everyone had the same opinion of the timeline of that history.

Most thought the big day was July 4, when then Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence and sent it to the printer. But John Adams believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day.

Confederate flags are coming down across the South as governments and institutions respond to calls to remove symbols of a racist past. At the University of Texas at Austin, thousands of students have petitioned the school to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis, who was president of the Confederate States of America during the Civil War.

Last Friday the Supreme Court made a landmark decision for gay rights. But another institution has also played a significant role in changing American public opinion about this issue: Hollywood.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about the “Modern Family effect” and how television has changed the way Americans think about gay relationships.

DJ Session: Sounds For The Holiday Weekend

Jul 2, 2015

For the upcoming holiday weekend, this week’s edition of the Here & Now DJ Sessions features KCRW’s Anthony Valadez, with new music from the artist Bilal, a trained opera singer who has now gone in a very different direction. He also shares songs from U.K. artist LA Priest, Canadian singer and musician Mocky and Argentine DJ/producer Chancha Via Circuito.

Facebook is millennials’ No. 1 source for political news, according to a recent study by Pew Research Center. Now, other social media outlets are trying to get on board.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with media analyst John Carroll about social networks’ stampede to become news outlets and get journalists on staff.

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