Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

DJ Sessions: Go Deadhead

Fans attend a Grateful Dead concert at Red Rocks, Colorado, 1987. (Mark L. Knowles/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 2:18 pm

The Grateful Dead celebrates 50 years since the band’s start this year. For this week’s installment of DJ Sessions, we sit down with a DJ who devotes his entire radio show to the band.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Tensions Escalating On Israel's Northern Borders

Israeli military vehicles are seen burning in the Shebaa farms an occupied area along the Israeli-Lebanese border near Ghajar village, on January 28, 2015, following a Hezbollah missile attack. A missile attack killed two Israeli soldiers and Israel responded with air and ground strikes on southern Lebanon, where a UN peacekeeper was killed. (Maruf Khatib/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 2:18 pm

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is blaming Iran for the violent flare ups along the Lebanese and Syrian border areas in the country’s north. Yesterday’s shelling by the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah was the deadliest escalation in that region since 2006, resulting in the deaths of two Israeli soldiers and seven wounded.

Iran has long backed Hezbollah, which declared its attack an act of retaliation for an Israeli airstrike in Syria earlier this month. That attack killed six Hezbollah fighters and an Iranian general.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Thu January 29, 2015

Red Fox Sighting In Yosemite Is First In Nearly 100 Years

This red fox, photographed in 2002, was part of a study in Lassen Volcanic National Park. Note the white round plastic tag in the animal’s right ear. (Keith Slausen/USFS/PSW)

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 2:18 pm

A Sierra Nevada red fox has been captured on a motion-sensitive camera placed by wildlife biologists in a remote part of Yosemite National Park in California.

It’s the first time in nearly 100 years that the state-protected mammal has been seen in the park. Fewer than 50 are known to exist in North America.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Disability Advocates Fight Disabled Governor

Texas Governor-Elect Greg Abbott listens to questions from the press after a meeting at the White House December 5, 2014 in Washington, D.C. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 7:57 am

For the first time since 1987, one of the nation’s governors is in a wheelchair. Texas Governor Greg Abbott won the race by promising to fight the federal government with his literal “spine of steel,” but disability advocates are saying that he hasn’t fought for them.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

$4.5 Million, 30 Seconds, 1 Super Bowl Ad: Priceless?

The Super Bowl ad from the glue maker Loctite involves people dancing with fanny packs. (YouTube)

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 9:30 am

This Sunday is the Super Bowl, which means the biggest and most expensive advertising night of the year. Several of this year’s ads are already available online, in part or in full.

Television is far from the only way to advertise during the game these days, so at $4.5 million for 30 seconds, is it still worth it?

Here & Now’s media analyst John Carroll joins host Lisa Mullins to discuss that question and some of this year’s ads.

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NPR Story
1:29 pm
Wed January 28, 2015

Brisket Shortage Has BBQ Lovers Gnashing Their Teeth

Drought conditions are forcing ranchers to thin their cattle herds, and that means there’s a shortage of brisket, the front-end cut of beef that’s emblematic of Texas barbecue.

Texas Monthly barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that higher commodity prices have even forced one best-in-state barbecue restaurant to close down recently.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Proposal Could Open Parts Of Atlantic, Close Parts Of Arctic To Drilling

This 2007 photo provided by Shell Exploration & Production Company shows the Frontier Discoverer drilling rig as it sits in Dutch Harbor, Alaska. (Shell Exploration & Production via AP)

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 3:26 pm

The Obama Administration today is proposing opening up parts of the Eastern seaboard to offshore drilling, while at the same time proposing a ban on drilling along some parts of Alaska’s Arctic coast.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Phil Flynn, an energy market analyst with Price Futures Group, and Bob Deans of the Natural Resources Defense Council, about the proposal — a win and a loss each for environmentalists and the oil industry

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Report: All 50 States Failing To Help Abused And Neglected Kids

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 3:26 pm

A report released by the Children’s Advocacy Institute today shows that all 50 states have failed to meet minimum federal requirements for the care of abused and neglected kids.

The institute’s executive director Robert Fellmeth tells Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins that even when the federal government finds that a state is not meeting its requirements, not much changes.

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NPR Story
2:19 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

Why Aren't There More Latinos On TV?

Cristela Alonzo stars in the ABC sitcom "Cristela." She also created and writes for the show. (Adam Taylor/ABC)

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 3:26 pm

The big four television networks have made progress in diversifying their casts, but only among African-American actors. That’s according to recent numbers compiled by the Associated Press.

Latinos represent about 17 percent of the American population, but on network T.V., that group represents less than 10 percent of characters.

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Snowy Owls 'Irrupting' In Northern States

A snowy owl is tagged with a transmitter. (Alan Richard)

For a second year in a row, a mass migration of snowy owls from Canada is occurring, and that’s highly unusual. It’s called an irruption and it’s thought to be related to boom and bust cycles of arctic lemmings, the small rodents that snowy owls love to eat.

Author and naturalist Scott Weidensaul is co-founder of Project SNOWstorm, which since last year has been using cellphone technology to track these mysterious and majestic birds.

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