Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Iraq Launches Offensive Against ISIS

This image posted on a militant website on Saturday, June 14, 2014, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, appears to show militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant leading away captured Iraqi soldiers dressed in plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq. (AP Photo via militant website)

Backed by allied Shiite and Sunni fighters, Iraqi security forces today began a large-scale military operation to recapture Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit from the extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State.

The offensive is seen as a major step in a campaign to reclaim a large swath of territory in northern Iraq controlled by ISIS.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Revisiting The Pre-WWII Chinese Nightclubs With Author Lisa See

A promotional playbill from the Forbidden City nightclub, which was in business from the late 1930s to the late 1950s. (Wikimedia Commons)

Last year, Chinese American author Lisa See spoke with us about her latest book, “China Dolls.” The book tells the story of popular Chinese nightclubs in San Francisco in the late 1930s.

With the release of the paperback edition of the novel this week, we revisit Here & Now host Robin Young’s conversation with Lisa See.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Warren Buffett's Letter To Shareholders Only Hints At Successor

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett speaks at an event called, "Detroit Homecoming" September 18, 2014 in Detroit, Michigan. (Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

There’s long been speculation about who will take the reins as CEO of Berkshire Hathaway when Warren Buffett steps down.

This weekend, that speculation continued as Buffett repeated that he had identified his successor. His vice chair Charlie Munger, in a separate letter, named two Berkshire employees – Ajit Jain and Greg Abel – as among those likely to get the job.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

Young Singers Beat The Odds To Sing With National Honor Choir

Fifth graders (from left) Claire Thompson, Sophia Porreca and Tamilyn Lechuga all attend Kunsmiller Creative Arts Academy. (Courtesy Denver Public Schools)

Tonight and tomorrow, 1,200 students from across the country will perform with the National Children’s Honor Choir in Salt Lake City.

It’s one of the most prestigious junior choruses in the country. Among them will be three students from a school in southwest Denver, where more than three-quarters of the kids qualify for free or reduced lunch.

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

After Red Carpet Controversy, A Look At The History Of Dreadlocks

Actress Zendaya attends the 87th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 22, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:24 pm

On Sunday’s glamorous Academy Awards red carpet, Disney star Zendaya Coleman decided to shake things up and wear dreadlocks extensions with her Oscar gown.

The following day when the E! network’s Fashion Police aired, the show’s co-host Giuliana Rancic commented that the 18-year-old woman looked like she smelled of “patchouli oil” or “weed.”

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NPR Story
1:58 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

'Star Trek' Star Leonard Nimoy Dies At 83

Actor Leonard Nimoy arrives at the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'Star Trek Into Darkness' at the Dolby Theatre on May 14, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:36 pm

Leonard Nimoy, known around the world as Spock on “Star Trek,” died this morning at age 83. Nimoy, of course, was more than just Spock. He was a poet, a photographer and a musician. But he touched a chord as the brainy, unflappably logical, half-human half-Vulcan Spock.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For A Glimpse At A GOP Presidential Hopeful, Head To CPAC

Volunteers walk by a stand at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, outside Washington, D.C. on February 26, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 3:03 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, usually attracts the country’s most die-hard conservative activists. This year it’s also attracting nearly a dozen – depending on how you count – Republican presidential hopefuls for 2016.

NPR’s Don Gonyea is there and joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about who’s at CPAC to show off their stuff, and how they might try to win hearts and minds.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:17 am

‘Tis the season to speculate who’s going to run for president, who will make it through the primary, who will ultimately end up in Oval Office.

But before you slap a bumper sticker on your car, or hang a political cartoon at work, you might want to think twice. Because it turns out that either of those could get you fired. And in most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you.

While federal law bars employers from firing workers for race, religion or gender, there is no protection for freedom of political speech or action.

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NPR Story
1:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Peter Bloom of Rhizomatica meets with the authorities in Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca. Rhizomatica is a non-profit group in Oaxaca city that has helped 16 remote villages install and operate their own cell phone networks. (rhizomatica.org)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 2:17 pm

Cellphones are just about everywhere these days. But in remote, rural places the key ingredient – a cell network – is often missing. In the U.S., long-distance users pay a surcharge into the Universal Service Fund, which the government uses to pay network operators to provide affordable phone access in rural or low-income areas.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed February 25, 2015

Senate Dems Agree To GOP Plan To Fund Homeland Department

Senate Democrats on Wednesday signed onto a Republican plan to fund the Homeland Security Department without the immigration provisions opposed by President Barack Obama. The announcement by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid put the Senate on track to pass the bill as a partial agency shutdown looms Friday at midnight.

The House’s response was uncertain. Earlier Wednesday, House Republicans reacted tepidly at best to the plan from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who proposed decoupling the issue of DHS funding from immigration.

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