Here and Now

Monday - Thursday at 1:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd is retracing part of the route that Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train took 150 years ago. The train was carrying the body of the late president and was making its way to Springfield, Illinois from Washington, D.C.

The HBO film “Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown” won a Peabody Award this week. When the documentary first premiered, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson spoke with the filmmaker, Alex Gibney, longtime Brown trombonist Fred Wesley and Michael Veal, a professor of ethnomusicology. We revisit that conversation.

Drone Strike Deaths Raise Questions

21 hours ago

Italy says it wants more information from the United States about how an Italian aid worker was killed in a U.S. drone strike on the Afghan-Pakistani border.

If “Full House” was a major part of your childhood, you might get a kick out of this. Netflix announced this week that it’s coming back – as “Fuller House.”

John Stamos – or Uncle Jesse – will produce the new series, and will also reprise his role, along with some of his old co-stars (though not all).

“Full House” is just the latest in a parade of old favorites that seem to be returning to television. There’s also “Arrested Development,” “The X-Files,” “Coach,” “Twin Peaks,” “Boy Meets World” (reimagined as “Girl Meets World”), “Bewitched” and the list goes on.

Mike Barry of The Guardian joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to look at how the news is reverberating on social media. The stories include:

Big farms are collecting taxpayer dollars that they haven’t necessarily earned, by taking advantage of a loophole in government subsidy rules, according to regulators, members of Congress and the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is taking aim at what is known as the “actively engaged” loophole, which has been gaping for nearly three decades, by changing the qualifications for some subsidy payments.

The Modi government in India is considering a proposal to replace the tiger – the iconic symbol of India since the 1970s – with the lion. Vicki Croke of WBUR’s The Wild Life joins Here & Now hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson with details on the tiny community of wild Asian lions – a remnant of a once much larger population.

The marathon bombing trial is now in the sentencing stage. The 12 jurors will decide whether or not Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will get the death penalty. If the lawyer representing Tsarnaev has her way, the 21-year-old will spend his life in prison and not be put to death.

Navinder Sarao is making an initial court appearance in the U.K., after he was arrested yesterday by British authorities on U.S. charges that he helped cause what’s known as the “flash crash,” when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell by 1,000 points on May 6, 2010.

CNN’s Maggie Lake joins Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson to take a look at this case, as well as the trial over the 2008 government bailout of American International Group, or AIG. Closing arguments are being delivered today.

Blue Bell Creameries is voluntarily recalling all of its products after the bacteria listeria was found in two cartons of Blue Bell ice cream in March.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that tests indicate the outbreak started from plants in Texas and Oklahoma.

Five adults have been sickened, and three have died. Officials in Kansas say listeriosis didn’t cause the deaths, but it may have been a contributing factor. Blue Bell distributes ice cream and other frozen desserts to about half of the United States.

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