T. S. Strickland

T. S. Strickland 

http://www.ussoriskanydiver.com/USS%20Oriskany.htm

 

 It’s been almost a decade since the U.S.S. Oriskany was sunk 20 miles off the coast of Northwest Florida. That event created the largest artificial reef in the world and set off a wave of commerce in Northwest Florida, as fishing boats and dive operators capitalized on the new resource. 

Those businesses have been on the decline since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but, now, Escambia County officials think they might know how to right the ship again: by sinking another one. 

 

September 30 is the final deadline for those wishing to submit projects for RESTORE funding. With only two weeks left to apply, one group of residents is proposing an innovative solution to address downtown Pensacola’s stormwater problems. 

The group, which includes archeologist Elizabeth Benchley, local attorney Erick Mead and sustainability consultant Christian Wagley, have proposed resurrecting a subterranean, colonial-era creek to create a walkable riverfront in the heart of downtown. 

Daniel Mota

Triumph Gulf Coast Inc., the nonprofit corporation charged with distributing $1.5 billion in economic damages from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, held its inaugural meeting Tuesday. At Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort, where the event was held, the conversation could be summed up with two words: “diversify” and “collaborate.”

"My hope is that these funds will be used to diversify and deepen our economy so that we can be more and more the masters of our own economic fate," Florida state Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, said at the meeting’s start.  

T. S. Strickland

When temperatures spike, as they did during last week’s heat wave, the first to feel the heat are often the area’s homeless residents.

 

 

Area experts say though most homeless citizens are resilient and able to make do with existing resources, many particularly women, families and those with illnesses – struggle to find shelter and stay hydrated when temperatures climb.