Joshua Morton

On-Air Host/Reporter

Josh is a 2014 graduate of UWF. He hosts the afternoon program line-up on WUWF between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.  weekdays, and is a reporter for WUWF News. He has published concert reviews in Infectious and Get Amped magazines, and also has written for The Voyager and Argo Verge. He hosts a music program on Radio Free Pensacola, The Salt Mines. He also enjoys writing and performing music .

Courtesy of NAS Whiting Field

NAS Whiting Field has two main air fields: North and South. In the North field, they conduct pilot training for fixed wing aircraft, primarily the T-6 Texan. In the South field, they conduct training for TH-57 helicopters.
Two of the runways in their South field have been scheduled to have some repairs done to them, beginning in a few months.

Jay Cope, Public Affairs Officer for NAS Whiting Field, says the repairs are standard and to be expected after so many years.

Josh Morton

  "Music for Families" started on Saturday at about 9:30, with virtually the entire second floor of the Saenger Theatre filled with activity stations. There were science displays from the Pensacola MESS Hall and the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC), an arts and crafts table for kids to make masquerade masks out of paper plates, and a concert from the orchestra to cap it all off.  

Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition

Pensacola is hosting the first ever annual Lionfish Removal and Awareness Day Festival and Tournament this weekend. The event is being organized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, in conjunction with the Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition and several other local partners. The goal is to raise awareness about the threat lionfish are posing to the Gulf Coast ecosystem and fisheries.

Josh Morton

Last week almost 40 older adult drivers showed up to take part in the first ever CarFit event to be held at the University of West Florida. CarFit is an educational program that looks at issues older drivers may be having, and seeks to find and present solutions to these issues, bringing about a better sense of safety and comfort to the drivers and the vehicles they are being fitted for.

Fran Carlin-Rogers, a national CarFit instructor, drove up from Orlando to do the training for all of the participating CarFit volunteers as well as run the event itself. 

Joshua Morton

With Spring Break now coming to an end for a majority of college students across the country, many will return to the classroom with stories of days and nights spent partying down in Daytona or Panama City Beach. Some students, however, invested their time in what is commonly referred to as an “alternative spring break,” building homes for families in need.

For nearly three decades, Habitat for Humanity has welcomed thousands of vacationing students.

University of West Florida

With fall s'mester just around the corner, students at the University of West Florida only have a few weeks left to make the most of what’s left of their summer vacay. I took a walk around the campus and asked the handful of students I could find how they had been spending their summer so far.

David Giampa will be a junior this fall and is studying maths and economic. Outside of class and his job as a tutor in the maths lab on campus. He says he hasn’t been up to much. 

Dana Morton

Update at end of story.

People who live in the Wedgewood area are starting to gain some traction in their effort to get local, state, and federal officials to do something about the pollution coming from nearby borrow pits and landfills. The Escambia County Commission is now considering a six-month moratorium on the permitting and re-permitting of borrow pits and landfills in the Wedgewood area.  The move toward a moratorium follows the July 22 tour of some of the facilities by Commission Chairman Lumon May and State Representative Mike Hill.

Josh Morton

The Florida Department of Health in Escambia County will continue to evaluate the results of air quality monitoring around the Wedgewood Community Center and Rolling Hills Landfill, after issuing a health alert Tuesday for elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide.

Hours earlier, Escambia County Commission Chairman Lumon May and District 2 State Representative Mike Hill toured the Rolling Hills facility and others in the area to see their impact on the surrounding community.

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Michael Lindsey/Released

For the first time in nearly 50 years, the Pensacola Naval Air Station has a new aircraft on display at the main gate. As part of a series of events to celebrate the base’s 100 year anniversary, a special ceremony was held Tuesday to unveil the new plane: partial coverings were removed, revealing special details on the plane,  which was painted in the Blue Angels blue and gold.

City of Pensacola

When it comes to shaping cities and neighborhoods, since the late 1940s, urban developers have catered developments to the invention and expansion of the automobile. Cars allowed people to spread out more and paved the way for urban sprawl. This concept of spreading everything out, in turn can result in “pressure that pushes us into more marginal areas for development than we would otherwise.” That’s according to Christian Wagley, a local environmental advocate and green building consultant. What happens when development occurs in those “more marginal areas”?