Joshua Morton

Summer Intern

Joshua is a senior at the University of West Florida, majoring in journalism.  He has published concert reviews in Infectious and Get Amped magazines, and also has written for The Voyager and Argo Verge. He hosts a show on Radio Free Pensacola, The Salt Mines. He also enjoys writing and performing music around town.

Hydrogen Sulfide Detected
4:21 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Health Alert Issued After Tour of Wedgewood Area Pits

Rolling Hills Construction & Demolotion Pit
Josh Morton

The Florida Department of Health in Escambia County will continue to evaluate the results of air quality monitoring around the Wedgewood Community Center and Rolling Hills Landfill, after issuing a health alert Tuesday for elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide.

Hours earlier, Escambia County Commission Chairman Lumon May and District 2 State Representative Mike Hill toured the Rolling Hills facility and others in the area to see their impact on the surrounding community.

Read more
NAS Pensacola 100
5:54 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

NAS Pensacola Celebrates 100 Years

Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class Brandon Dodd, a member of the Blue Angels maintenance team, helps unveil the new Blue Angels F/A-18 Hornet display at the entrance of Naval Air Station Pensacola during a ceremony celebrating the base’s 100th anniver
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Michael Lindsey/Released

For the first time in nearly 50 years, the Pensacola Naval Air Station has a new aircraft on display at the main gate. As part of a series of events to celebrate the base’s 100 year anniversary, a special ceremony was held Tuesday to unveil the new plane: partial coverings were removed, revealing special details on the plane,  which was painted in the Blue Angels blue and gold.

Read more
Flood Recovery
11:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Could Rethinking Development Mitigate Flood Damage?

Admiral Mason Park is an example of attractive stormwater retention.
City of Pensacola

When it comes to shaping cities and neighborhoods, since the late 1940s, urban developers have catered developments to the invention and expansion of the automobile. Cars allowed people to spread out more and paved the way for urban sprawl. This concept of spreading everything out, in turn can result in “pressure that pushes us into more marginal areas for development than we would otherwise.” That’s according to Christian Wagley, a local environmental advocate and green building consultant. What happens when development occurs in those “more marginal areas”?

Read more