Dave Dunwoody

Journalist/Producer

Dave came to WUWF in September, 2002, after 14 years as News Director at the Alabama Radio Network in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham and a total of 27 years in commercial radio. During that time, he also served as Alabama Bureau Chief for United Press International.

The Trion, Georgia native was news director at stations in Anniston, Scottsboro and Fort Payne in Alabama, where he also broadcast football, basketball and baseball play-by-play. Dave also “played the hits” at rock and country music stations in Lafayette, Albany and Rome, Georgia and in Burlington, North Carolina.

During his time at WUWF, Dave has earned a B.A. in Communication Arts/Journalism at the University of West Florida (Class of 2012).  He’s married to the former Linda Shiell, a Pensacola native, and they live in Pensacola with their cats Gigi, Lucy, and Zoe. Dave is also a passionate fan of Georgia Bulldogs, Atlanta Falcons, and West Florida Argonauts football; the Atlanta Braves, Pensacola Blue Wahoos, and Pensacola Ice Flyers.  His hobbies include comedy writing, guitar and computer sports games.

northescambia.com

Ten months after work began, Pensacola’s Habitat for Humanity is winding up construction of 16 news homes in Century, replacing some that were leveled by a tornado in February, 2016.

When Habitat Director Tim Evans and his team first got to Century, the one prevailing question was – where to start?

“That is exactly it – it’s just heartbreaking when we first got to the community,” said Evans. “Seeing the amount of damage and so much total destruction on so many homes; it really was kind of tough deciding how to begin.”

strongtowns.org

Tuesday night kicks off “CivicCon” – an initiative by the Studer Community Institute aimed at collecting ideas about handling future growth in Pensacola.

CivicCon is short for “Civic Conversations.” Organizer Christian Wagley says a number of decisions regarding Pensacola are looming on the horizon.

Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Four months after getting the call, the new Bishop for the Pensacola-Tallahassee Catholic Diocese is on the job. WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody recently sat down with Bishop William Wack at the Diocese’s Pensacola Pastoral Center.

Back in May, Father Bill was at his parish – St. Ignatius in Austin, Texas – working on the building’s air conditioning system after a lightning strike. Then his phone rang.

That phone call would change his life.

ramusa.org

Volunteers are being sought to staff a two-day free medical clinic, sponsored by the Pensacola Remote Area Clinic on Saturday and Sunday, December 2-3, at Pensacola High School on Maxwell Street.

Organizer JoAnn VanFleteren at the Pensacola Remote Area Clinic says volunteers, both medical and non-medical, are needed. The event is divided into three core categories – dental, medical and vision.

“Dental – cleanings, extractions, and cavities,” VanFleteren says. “Medical – pap smears as well as annual checkups. And they will actually make glasses for people on the spot.”

reena.org

The High Holy Days are upon us, with Jews in Pensacola and around the world preparing their observances.

First up is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year 5778, which begins at sundown Wednesday and ends at nightfall on Friday.

“Rosh Hashanah is one of four biblical New Year’s, that’s a spiritual new year,” says Rabbi Joel Fleekop at Temple Beth-el in Pensacola – founded in 1876, it’s Florida’s oldest Jewish congregation.

NOAA

Governor Rick Scott’s being praised for his response to Hurricane Irma; but could that carry over to next year’s U.S. Senate race? 

Scott is gaining praise for his preparation and reaction to the storm, which has left millions of Floridians in the dark and dealing with floods. Hundreds of thousands of others took his advice and left for safer areas.

“This is a deadly storm,” Scott said as Irma battered her way through the Caribbean. “If you’ve been ordered to evacuate, you need to leave now. Do not wait – evacuate.”

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority

Water, water everywhere in south Florida, but not a lot of it to drink. The Emerald Coast Utilities Authority is lending a hand, part of the assistance coming from the Florida Panhandle.

ECUA Executive Director Steve Sorrell says a mutual response team has been organized, acting on a request from the Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) for lift station and maintenance crews to help with that city’s wastewater system.

Gulf Power Company

As the remnants of Irma dissipate from Tennessee to the Carolinas, work is underway to restore power to 15 million people in parts of south Florida hit by the former Category-5 Hurricane. That includes help from the Panhandle.

More than 150 Gulf Power storm crew left Pensacola and Panama City early Tuesday morning for heavily damaged areas, after power was restored to 13,000 customers in Bay County that was knocked out by Tropical Storm Irma’s high winds.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Along with hosting concerts, home improvement shows, sports, and other events over its 32-year span, the Pensacola Bay Center is once again a shelter for those having fled Hurricane Irma in south Florida.

As of Monday morning, there were 286 people housed at the center’s shelter on the ground floor. Gloria Wiggins with the American Red Cross who is shelter manager, says that number is fluctuating.

“As people leave, they’re trying to go home,” said Wiggins. “Some of them are told to come back, because the weather is not safe for them to be traveling. So, we’re here.”

Two Men and a Truck

Two Men and a Truck’s Pensacola office is joining with "Truck 4 Texas," in taking supplies to flood victims in east Texas. The items were collected in part by students at local Catholic schools. 

The idea began with an eighth grade student at St. Paul’s Catholic School in Pensacola. Matt Knee, the Executive Director of Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida, says it mushroomed from there to four other schools.

cdc.gov

Escambia County’s first case of West Nile virus is now confirmed, prompting reminders about how to protect yourself from the disease.

As is the practice, the patient is not being identified – other than they’re an Escambia County resident. The Florida Department of Health-Escambia has issued a mosquito-borne illness advisory, for what Health Director Dr. John Lanza calls an “endemic.”

As it begins its trek through Louisiana, Tropical Storm Harvey is being felt across the Florida Panhandle and south Alabama.

Rain and plenty of it, compliments of Harvey, is forecast to inundate the area at least through Thursday across southeast Mississippi, southwest Alabama and northwest Florida.

“We’ve already received in the Pensacola Metro four to six inches; we’ve seen a couple of isolated gauge reports of seven inches,” says meteorologist Jason Beaman at the National Weather Service in Mobile.

bbb.org

Calls are going out to help those victimized by Hurricane Harvey. But the challenge is, which are legitimate and which are not? That’s where the Better Business Bureau can help.

More than 20 inches of rain has fallen over parts of Texas, with another 15-25 inches expected in the days to come. Help is pouring in, and neighbors have been helping neighbors.

That’s the best of it; then there’s the dark side.

pbs.org

As east Texas continues to be deluged by the remnants of Hurricane Harvey, help is coming from a number of states, including Florida. And some of that assistance is from the Panhandle.

“This has happened to us, we know what its like,” said Jerry Kindle, Executive Director of the American Red Cross' northwest Florida chapter. "The Gulf Coast has always been a very giving community, and we appreciate all the assistance we’re getting.”

The deployments from the Red Cross' service area in the Panhandle began Friday to both Texas and Louisiana.

WUWF Public Media

iTEN WIRED, the annual conference that draws executives, engineers, entrepreneurs and others in the technology fields, is set for early October at Pensacola Beach.

This event dates back to 2009, when the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce began it as a quarterly event. But Jim Rhodes, now in his fifth year as conference director, says it eventually morphed into the annual event of today.

While Florida is not in the path of Hurricane Harvey, the storm’s effects could be felt as early as next week, both outdoors and at the gas pump.

Harvey is forecast to strengthen to a Category-3 storm before reaching south or central Texas late Friday night or early Saturday morning,the first hurricane to hit Texas since 2008, when Ike crashed ashore near Galveston killing 21 people in Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas, and causing widespread destruction.

cdc.gov

Sacred Heart Hospital is launching “Prevent T-2,” a new diabetes program aimed at helping pre-diabetic people avoid development of the disease.

“T-2” refers to type-2 diabetes.

“A ‘pre-diabetic’ is a person who falls into a blood sugar range that’s not quite diabetes yet,” says Ethel Hoyt, a registered nurse and patient educator at Sacred Heart. She is the program’s facilitator.

Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Father William Wack was ordained and installed as the sixth Bishop to serve the Pensacola-Tallahassee Catholic Diocese Tuesday, in a ceremony at the Pensacola Bay Center.

The Bay Center was selected as the venue for the high mass over the 57 parishes in the sprawling diocese, because of the expected attendance. The front row was occupied by Wack’s family – he’s one of nine siblings. Both upper and lower decks were filed with friends, Catholic school students, and other supporters. – including a contingent from his former parish, St. Ignatius in Austin, Texas.

nasa.gov

After months of anticipation, the first total solar eclipse across the United States in almost four decades did not disappoint – even in areas with some cloud cover, such as Pensacola.

Hundreds gathered at the Planetarium at Pensacola State College to view something nobody in this country had seen since 1979.The moon began moving across the sun just after noon, with peak coverage roughly 82 percent at 1:37 p.m.

Retired PSC astronomer Wayne Wooten had a selection of telescopes on hand, including one antique model that dates back to the start of the Apollo space program.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Debate is underway at Pensacola City Hall, over the proposed removal of a Confederate monument from its current location. If it is removed, a local cemetery is ready to accept it.

St. John’s Cemetery on G Street could become the new home for the “Our Confederate Dead” monument, which was erected in 1891 at Robert E. Lee Square.

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