Dave Dunwoody

Assistant News Director

Dave came to WUWF in September, 2002, after 14 years as News Director at the Alabama Radio Network in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham and a total of 27 years in commercial radio.

The Trion, Georgia native was also news director at stations in Anniston, Scottsboro and Fort Payne in Alabama, where he also broadcast football, basketball and baseball play-by-play. Dave also “spun the hits” at rock and country music stations in Lafayette, Albany and Rome, Georgia and Burlington, North Carolina.

During his time at WUWF, Dave has earned a B.A. in Communication Arts/Journalism at the University of West Florida (Class of 2012).  He’s married to the former Linda Shiell, a Pensacola native, and they live in Pensacola with their cat Callie and dog Monty. Dave is also a passionate fan of Georgia Bulldogs and Atlanta Falcons football; the Atlanta Braves, Pensacola Blue Wahoos and Pensacola Ice Flyers. His hobbies include comedy writing, guitar and computer sports games.

Ways To Connect


Work is ongoing to clean up a load of phosphoric acid that spilled into Fletcher Creek during the January 28th train derailment near McDavid in mid-Escambia County.

Authorities say up to 30,000 gallons of the acid – which is used in various products, including foods, beverages and pharmaceuticals – leaked when three tanker cars plunged into the creek, which feeds into both Cotton Lake and the Escambia River.


Naval Air Station Whiting Field has secured more than 490 acres, as part of its double mission of conservation and mission buffering.

That brings to roughly 3,500 acres the amount of land adjacent to the base that’s been purchased. Whiting Field worked on the transaction with Santa Rosa County, Navy Region Southeast and the Naval Facilities Command Southeast.

Total cost was $1.2 million. The money came from the Navy Readiness Environmental Protection Integration, and a grant from the Santa Rosa County Defense Infrastructure.

Florida Senate

Local school districts – and not the Florida Board of Education – would choose textbooks under legislation filed for the upcoming regular session.

About 30 states now use the local textbook-selection model. The measure would expand a law approved last year, which gives school districts the authority to review and select materials without state involvement. The districts would only have to certify that their choices complied with state standards.

Visit Pensacola Beach

The U.S. House voted 220-194 Thursday, to approve a bill that would allow residents of Pensacola Beach and Navarre Beach to get ownership of their leased properties, and to begin paying taxes on them. It now goes to the Senate, where its future is murky.

Sponsored by Congressman Jeff Miller, the measure would remove restrictions in the original 1947 deed barring Escambia County from issuing titles to land on Santa Rosa Island.

“Instead, the county began leasing the property to individuals, who could pay a lease fee, instead of being charged a property tax,” Miller said. 

ST Aerospace

Governor Rick Scott’s proposed budget for next fiscal year includes $325 million for aviation improvements, as part of a $9 billion investment in strategic transportation improvements throughout the state.

The announcement was made at Tuesday’s Florida Airports Council Meeting in Tallahassee, as part of Gov. Scott’s “It’s Your Money Tax Cut Budget.” Pensacola International Airport is in line for $14 million. Director Greg Donovan says the money is earmarked for expansion projects – including attempts to lure ST Aerospace.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Pete Shinnick was introduced Thursday, as the first head football coach at the University of West Florida. The work now begins towards the first game in September of 2016.

By her count, UWF President Judy Bense has waited five years, four months and 32 days for today’s announcement.

“I now can finally answer the question that I have been asked more as president than any other question,” said Bense. “”When are we going to start UWF football?’”


Charges have been filed against a former supervisor at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s crime lab.

A prepared statement from FDLE said that investigators believe 32-year-old Gerald Graves replaced prescription pain pills with over-the-counter medications while processing drug cases since 2005. As a crime lab analyst, Graves had worked nearly 26 hundred cases for 80 law enforcement agencies in 35 counties, including Escambia and Santa Rosa.

Graves is free on 290 thousand dollars bond. State Attorney Bill Eddins says he faces a number of charges.


The Food and Drug Administration is launching an advertising campaign targeting at-risk youth highlighting the dangers of smoking. Similar efforts can also be found at the grassroots level.

FDA’s campaign, called "The Real Cost," is set to launch next week with ads on TV and radio in more than 200 U-S markets for at least one year. It also will use print and social media, using youth-oriented topics.


Florida’s new second-in-command began work on Monday. Carlos Lopez-Cantera is the state’s 19th lieutenant governor and first Latino to hold that office.

The 40-year-old Lopez-Cantera -- a former state legislator and Miami-Dade Property Appraiser -- was sworn in by Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Ricky Polston in a small, private ceremony held in the governor's office. A public swearing-in was held Monday afternoon.

As part of his remarks, Lopez-Cantera recited some of the talking points he and Governor Rick Scott will carry onto the campaign trail this year.


The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has begun the examination of alleged evidence tampering by a former employee in its Pensacola crime lab. On Monday, Joseph Graves resigned as the lab’s analyst supervisor.

Graves’ resignation comes in the wake of allegations that he may have tampered with evidence from the cases. He had been suspended with pay.
Speaking Saturday in Tallahassee, FDLE Commissioner Gerald Bailey said the probe involves 80 law enforcement agencies in 35 counties, including Escambia and Santa Rosa. The reach is as far south as Monroe County.