Dave Dunwoody

Assistant News Director

Dave came to WUWF in September, 2002, after 14 years as News Director at the Alabama Radio Network in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham and a total of 27 years in commercial radio. During that time, he also served as Alabama Bureau Chief for United Press International.

The Trion, Georgia native was news director at stations in Anniston, Scottsboro and Fort Payne in Alabama, where he also broadcast football, basketball and baseball play-by-play. Dave also “spun the hits” at rock and country music stations in Lafayette, Albany and Rome, Georgia and in Burlington, North Carolina.

During his time at WUWF, Dave has earned a B.A. in Communication Arts/Journalism at the University of West Florida (Class of 2012).  He’s married to the former Linda Shiell, a Pensacola native, and they live in Pensacola with their cats Gigi and Lucy. Dave is also a passionate fan of Georgia Bulldogs and Atlanta Falcons football; the Atlanta Braves, Pensacola Blue Wahoos, Pensacola Ice Flyers, and Tampa Bay Lightning. His hobbies include comedy writing, guitar and computer sports games.

cdc.gov

Sacred Heart Hospital is launching “Prevent T-2,” a new diabetes program aimed at helping pre-diabetic people avoid development of the disease.

“T-2” refers to type-2 diabetes.

“A ‘pre-diabetic’ is a person who falls into a blood sugar range that’s not quite diabetes yet,” says Ethel Hoyt, a registered nurse and patient educator at Sacred Heart. She is the program’s facilitator.

Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Father William Wack was ordained and installed as the sixth Bishop to serve the Pensacola-Tallahassee Catholic Diocese Tuesday, in a ceremony at the Pensacola Bay Center.

The Bay Center was selected as the venue for the high mass over the 57 parishes in the sprawling diocese, because of the expected attendance. The front row was occupied by Wack’s family – he’s one of nine siblings. Both upper and lower decks were filed with friends, Catholic school students, and other supporters. – including a contingent from his former parish, St. Ignatius in Austin, Texas.

nasa.gov

After months of anticipation, the first total solar eclipse across the United States in almost four decades did not disappoint – even in areas with some cloud cover, such as Pensacola.

Hundreds gathered at the Planetarium at Pensacola State College to view something nobody in this country had seen since 1979.The moon began moving across the sun just after noon, with peak coverage roughly 82 percent at 1:37 p.m.

Retired PSC astronomer Wayne Wooten had a selection of telescopes on hand, including one antique model that dates back to the start of the Apollo space program.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Debate is underway at Pensacola City Hall, over the proposed removal of a Confederate monument from its current location. If it is removed, a local cemetery is ready to accept it.

St. John’s Cemetery on G Street could become the new home for the “Our Confederate Dead” monument, which was erected in 1891 at Robert E. Lee Square.

nasa.gov

Americans across all 50 United States will get a treat from Mother Nature on Monday -- the first total solar eclipse visible nationwide in 38 years.

While the entire nation will experience some level of eclipse, the path of the “umbra” – where the eclipse is total – will be only about 100 miles wide and stretch from Oregon to South Carolina.

“We’re about 400 miles south of the center line, where they’ll see totality,” said Dr. Wayne Wooten, an astronomer who recently retired from Pensacola State College.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Coming off a 5-6 inaugural season and two and a half weeks before starting the 2017 season at Missouri S&T, Head Coach Pete Shinnick delivered his “State of the Team” address on Wednesday.

It’s been almost a year since the UWF football program kicked off against Ave Maria, and Shinnick says he and the coaching staff have been gauging themselves compared to what it was like last fall; what was it like last spring, and where the program is now.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Almost a year after plans were announced to sever ties with Sacred Heart Health System, Nemours will partner with West Florida Hospital to provide specialized care for children beginning this fall.

The care provided by the new partnership will extend beyond Pensacola to the rest of the western Panhandle, says Carlton Ulmer, West Florida President and CEO.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

The University of West Florida is playing host this weekend to an exercise by local emergency response organizations, which is aimed at beefing up community resilience.

Santa Rosa County Emergency Management is teaming up with SAFER – the Support Alliance for Emergency Readiness, and BRACE – the Be Ready Agency Coordinating for Emergencies.

“The Advanced Citizen Corps Academy started years and years ago, when we had excess grant money at the state level, and they asked if anybody wanted to do anything with it,” said SAFER Administrator Daniel Hahn.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

State and county health officials are sending out words of caution, after a case of vibrio vulnificus was confirmed in Escambia County.

No information is being released about the patient, other than it’s the sixth vibrio case in Escambia in the past three years, including another case earlier this year and the death of a resident in 2015. Last year, two Santa Rosa County residents died from the bacteria.

In the third and final installment of our “Back to School” series, we take a look at the Escambia County District.

With more than 40,000 students, Superintendent Malcolm Thomas oversees the largest district in the western Panhandle. And he adds there’s always a special enthusiasm at this time of year, just before the first class bell rings.

In part two of “Back to School,” WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody sits down with Santa Rosa County Superintendent Tim Wyrosdick, and what that district is facing in the new term.

For one thing, Wyrosdick is looking at higher numbers district-wide when classes kick off August 14.

“We’ll bump close to 29,000 students this year, and maybe go over that,” he says. “Our growth this year, probably in the neighborhood of 550-600 students.”

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson visited Pensacola State College on Monday, meeting with local officials and residents on a number of issues. While there, Nelson had one bit of good news for the area’s military bases.

“BRAC’s not coming; it’s not going to pass in the next [election] cycle,” said Nelson. “So y'all can stop worrying about that.”

Classes resume this week and next in public schools across Florida’s western Panhandle, with the usual challenges that a new school year brings the districts. In the first of our three-part series “Back to School,” Dave Dunwoody spoke with Okaloosa County Superintendent Mary Beth Jackson.

It’s a busy start to the new term. The biggest challenges, says Jackson, are getting rid of 160 portable classrooms on campuses; and 770 more students than in 2016-17 and growing at the rate of 100 per day. That brings the district’s total student population to more than 31,000.  

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Groundbreaking was held Tuesday morning near Milton, for construction of a Native American cultural center that’s due to be opened later this year.

Chief Blue Eyes, tribal leader Tom Nichols, and Dan Helms, an officer with the Santa Rosa County Creeks greeted the audience in both Creek and English on a warm, sunny morning at the construction site on Willard Norris Road.

“We started the tribe in 1990 with three members; today we have over 1,200, I believe,” said Blue Eyes. “We hoped and prayed and worked our tails off to get what we’ve got today.”

C-SPAN

The U.S. Senate is immersed in work on reforming healthcare, and at the same time dismantling the Affordable Care Act. And the chamber faces a long road ahead.

Florida’s two senators voted on either side of the measure, as expected. Republican Marco Rubio has been a longtime opponent of ACA.

ECUA

Water and sewer customers with Emerald Coast Utilities Authority could be shelling out more for those services in the near future.

When the board overseeing the agency meets on Thursday, it’s expected to take up a proposed capital improvement fee, $5 per month, to pay for upgrading water and sewer lines throughout the service area.

Lois Benson chairs the ECUA Board.  

Santa Rosa Creek Indian Tribe

If all goes as planned, a Native American cultural center will open near Milton by the end of this year. Groundbreaking is set for August 1 at 10 a.m. at the site, 4750 Willard Norris Road.

Dan Helms, an officer with the Santa Rosa County Creek Indian Tribe, says the center’s main mission is to stem the loss of Native American culture, artifacts and education.

“We have been accumulating, for more than 20 years, records, Census data, deeds, birth certificates, death certificates and all sorts of things that establish Native American bloodlines,” said Helms.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

About three dozen businesses in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties are getting together to form a private-sector entity, aimed at supporting economic development in the two counties.

First Place Partners has been in the works since last fall. The group’s president is former Gulf Power executive and Pensacola Chamber of commerce Chairman John Hutchinson.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

The return of passenger rail service to the Gulf Coast appears to be getting some mixed signals among the agencies and groups studying the matter.

Congress on Monday received the final report by the Federal Rail Commission’s Gulf Coast Passenger Rail Working Group, which is said to provide a positive endorsement of the Southern Rail Commission’s long standing call for restoration.

The next step, says Southern Rail Commission Chairman Greg White, is how to pay for it.

cdc.gov

The Florida Department of Health in Escambia County is out with a rabies advisory for the Warrington and Navy Point areas, and is on the lookout for any further such cases.

County Health Director Dr. John Lanza says the cases involved a pair of foxes in separate encounters with humans. The most recent attack resulted in the death of that fox.  As for the fox in the first attack, there is uncertainty.

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