Bob Barrett

News Anchor/Reporter

Bob Barrett has been a radio broadcaster since the mid 1970s and has worked at stations from northern New York to south Florida and, oddly, has been able to make a living that way. He began work in public radio in 2001. Over the years he has produced nationally syndicated programs such as The Environment Show and The Health Show for Northeast Public Radio's National Productions.

As well as reporting news and hosting afternoons for WUWF, Bob is the producer and host of The Best Of Our Knowledge, a syndicated program about education ... and produces podcasts for the medical journal Clinical Chemistry. He lives in Gulf Breeze with his family and is currently devising methods of keeping the squirrels off his bird feeders.

If you decided to run for office would you know where to start? How to build your organization? Who to ask for money and support? Now veteran political operatives are coming to town to train aspiring candidates in the art of campaigning.

www.gulfpower.com

Some Gulf Power customers have been targeted by scam artists.  Again. But at least they're being creative about it.

Natalie Smith, a communications Specialist with Gulf Power, says a new telephone scam is targeting Gulf Power commercial customers. The company has been fielding calls from customers reporting a new wrinkle to the classic scam. Now customers are told their power will be shut off unless they wire 25 hundred dollars to a local Western Union.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Kara Bryant has been busy. She is the Stability Coordinator for 90 Works, a non-profit in Pensacola that fights homelessness, poverty and family violence by helping people become self-sufficient.  She is also a certified Health Care Navigator under the Affordable Care Act. Open enrollment for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act closes at the end of business on Monday.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

A neighborhood park on North J Street in Pensacola got the professional treatment yesterday as members of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos grounds crew and front office spent the day revitalizing the ball park. 

Last season Ray Sayre of the Blue Wahoos won the grounds keeper of the year award in the Southern league.  Wednesday morning he and his crew were out at Terry Wayne East Park in Pensacola to give the baseball field a professional make over as part of an inner city outreach program from Major League Baseball.

Steve Cooke//Flickr Steve Cooke-SRAviation

There was a familiar sight in the air over El Centro, California on Saturday as the Blue Angels, the Navy's flight demonstration team began the 2014 season before a crowd of over 30,000. After spending most of 2013 on the ground, the Blue Angels made it back in the air this past weekend to start the 2014 show schedule. 

Penscon

It's been a couple of weeks since Pensacon took over much of downtown Pensacola, but the impact of the event on the region is still being evaluated.

UWF

One of the issues the legislature will take up in this year's session is Performance Based Funding for Florida's Universities.  And, if implemented, the system could cost the University of West Florida a lot of money.

UWF

Ground may be breaking soon on some long awaited commercial development at the University of West Florida.

Dr. Jim Barnett, the Interim CEO of the Business Enterprise Inc, or BEI, at the University of West Florida says the BEI Board of Difrectors approved the project at its February 17 meeting.  It goes to the full UWF Board of Trustees for final approval on March 26.  Barnett says that if approval is given, ground could be broken two days later. This would be the first phase of development at the University's Highway 90 and Campus Drive entrance.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Students across the state rallied today for more construction money for the state's universities.

Chris Hill is the Student Body President at the University of West Florida.He was one of the leaders of the rally at the UWF Commons Wednesday afternoon. He said the students "Hard Hat Rally" was to call attention to the need for more construction funds to improve university facilities at UWF, and across the state.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

If you see Jerrod Vunovich on TV, chances are he won't look anything like his picture here. That picture was taken this weekend at Pensacon where Jerrod sat on a panel with other actors from the AMC series The Walking Dead. Vunovich has a recurring role as one of the zombies, or walkers on the show.

The 6' 3" actor from Pensacola says he got on the show by answering an internet casting call looking for actors who were "deathly skinny". He was contacted the next day and invited to attend AMC's "Zombie School" which led to being cast as a recurring role as a walker.

Pensacon

There's a good chance you're going to see a lot of people in interesting costumes roaming the streets of Pensacola this weekend as Pensacon takes over the Bay Center and the Crown Plaza Hotel. The multi-genre fan convention is the brain child of chairman Mike Ensley, who sat down with WUWF's Bob Barrett to talk about this first time event.
 

mastcharter

The Florida Board of Education Tuesday unanimously approved changes to the Common Core standards. The meeting in Orlando was tense and the public comment portion was dominated by anti-common core activists who wanted the standards rescinded. Teachers around the region and around the country are expressing frustration over Common Core, and for many the standards themselves are the least of their worries. It's the uncertainty of how the standards, and by extension the teachers, will be evaluated.

American Heart Association

What does a heart attack look like? I suspect that if you had to put a face on a heart attack it would look like a stressed out, chain smoking, hard drinking Mad Men type. But while those people exist and they certainly are at risk for heart disease...more and more the face is becoming female. A great deal of attention is brought to women's risk of breast cancer but the fact is that heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the US. 

Once almost universally accepted and praised, the Common Core educational standards have come under increased attack recently.  The latest comes from the New York State United Teachers, withdrawing its support for Common Core not because of the standards themselves, but because of what they call the State Department of Education's failed implementation of the plan. Other states, mostly led by Republican governors, call Common Core a federal intrusion and blame the Obama administration for trying to take control of state education standards.  But Common Core began IN the states.

IHMC

A non-profit technology institute in Pensacola is set to begin a major expansion of its downtown campus. The Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition owns two acres of land bordered by Alcaniz, Romana and Flora Blanca Streets and is looking to bring its operations around the city together.

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