Bob Barrett

News Anchor/Reporter

Bob Barrett has been a radio broadcaster since the mid 1970s and has worked at stations from northern New York to south Florida and, oddly, has been able to make a living that way. He began work in public radio in 2001. Over the years he has produced nationally syndicated programs such as The Environment Show and The Health Show for Northeast Public Radio's National Productions.

As well as reporting news and hosting afternoons for WUWF, Bob is the producer and host of The Best Of Our Knowledge, a syndicated program about education ... and produces podcasts for the medical journal Clinical Chemistry. He lives in Gulf Breeze with his family and is currently devising methods of keeping the squirrels off his bird feeders.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Three and a half years after its long time headquarters were heavily damaged in a flood, Manna Food Pantry has finally moved into its new home and is getting ready to welcome clients.

The new location is the former Pensacola Mill Supply building at 3030 North E Street. The building was gutted, the roof replaced and the outside given a fresh, new look. Inside, there is 23,000 square feet of warehouse space that is starting to fill up with food. Volunteers are already at work sorting through donations from the recent Fill the Mayflower campaign.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

If you drive by the Cordova Mall in Pensacola before 7 p.m. on Tuesday you’ll see a big Mayflower Moving van parked out front. It’s there for the annual Fill The Mayflower Food Drive for Manna Food Pantries. For the last decade the Monday and Tuesday before Thanksgiving has been dedicated to this campaign. Manna’s Executive Director De De Flounlacker says this year they are asking for quality as well as quantity. "We're hoping to fill up this Mayflower truck, that's [about] 15,000 - 20,000 pounds of food, and that's wonderful.

University of West Florida

A fraternity at The University of West Florida has been suspended and a sorority is temporarily on hold and under investigation for violating rules of conduct.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Students from three Pensacola area schools got a tour of an oversized, technology filled motor coach last Thursday at the C-SPAN bus made a stop in town. The bus is touring the country now, visiting state capitols, book fairs and schools along the way. "The tour started in Delaware [in September] and we finish in November of 2018" said Jenae Green, one of the C-SPAN representatives who are giving tours to students on the bus. "We are going to all 50 state including Alaska and Hawaii, which everyone always gets real excited about.

Brett Douglas was born, raised and lived his whole life in Pensacola. It’s also where he became a drug addict. He is now in recovery and has written his story of growing up and living as an addict in the new book American Addict. Brett Douglas spoke about his life, and the book, with WUWF’s Bob Barrett.

Here are some of the topics that they discussed:

Entrepreneurs, techies and idea people will converge on downtown Pensacola this month as Start-Up Weekend returns to the city. This will be the fifth start-up weekend event in Pensacola, the last one happened in 2015. Kelly Reeser is the Director of Entrepreneurial Development with Florida West Economic Development Alliance and the director of Co-Lab Pensacola, a business incubator space in downtown Pensacola. She has been involved with every start-up weekend in town.

Although votes to repeal and replace "Obamacare” have come and gone, the Affordable Care Act is still the law of the land, and open enrollment begins on Wednesday, November 1. 

Sacred Heart health

A new study from the American Cancer Society shows that deaths from breast cancer have declined 39 percent since 1989. But the news is better for some groups than others. The study was published in the journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and that top line number of a 39 percent drop in breast cancer deaths is getting most of the attention. And advances in screening for breast cancer are getting a lot of the credit. 

The NPR podcast Serial became a sensation a few years ago, followed by S-Town. But you don’t have to look nationally to find a podcast telling a fascinating true story. MISTORY, a podcast featuring true crimes in Pensacola's history is produced at the University of West Florida. 

Guillermo Fesser is a journalist from Spain who has been living in the U.S. for about a decade. He had been looking for stories to tell about Spanish speaking heroes for young Latinos living in the states. "Suddenly I found, 2 years ago, that someone was trying to hang a painting (of a Hispanic general on Capitol Hill, who helped George )Washington win the Revolutionary War against the British.

FPREN

  

Governor Rick Scott was in Pensacola Thursday morning for a briefing and to update the media on Tropical Storm Nate. "Based on current forecasts from the National Hurricane Center, we expect the storm to continue its northward track as it moves into the Gulf of Mexico this weekend" said Scott after he emerged from the briefing surrounded by local officials at the Escambia County Emergency Operations center. "The storm has the potential to become a hurricane and impact the Florida Panhandle this weekend and families must be ready."

Autism Pensacola

Blue Wahoos Stadium will be alive with all sorts of heroes this weekend with the annual Steps For Autism event. "This is a fun, family event with lots of activities for the kids" said Susan Byrum, the President and CEO of Autism Pensacola. Steps For Autism is an event that raises money for Autism Pensacola. This is, in addition to the usual fund raising activities going on at the stadium that morning, Autism Pensacola will be honoring their local Hometown Heroes. "Because we appreciate everyone who puts themselves in harms way on our behalf.

tip-ser dot org

Sometimes major disasters like Hurricane Irma can make smaller mishaps like fires and car crashes seem small. But for the people involved, they are just as devastating and the need for help and comfort is immediate. That’s where the TIP program comes in. "TIP stands for the Trauma Intervention Program" said Cheryl Kulka, a volunteer with the TIP affiliate in Northwest Florida.

University of Texas San Antonio

Did piracy on the high seas play a role in developing the U.S. constitution and our system of courts? This year’s speaker at the Constitution Day celebration at the University of West Florida says aye. Now, to be sure, the annual UWF Constitution Day lecture usually doesn’t involve pirates and mutiny and privateers, but Dr. Matthew Brogdon, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at San Antonio and a UWF alum says he thought "Impressment, Mutiny, and the Seafaring Origins of the Federal Courts" made for a snappy title.

University of West Florida

The University of West Florida held an open house for their fall athletics programs Tuesday afternoon in preparation for the season starting this weekend. "Honestly, if you're in Pensacola this weekend and you're not in our gym, you're going to miss out!" said UWF Women’s Volleyball Head Coach Melissa Wolter. The season opening Hampton Inn-Vitational Tournament begins this Thursday evening at the university field house. UWF's first game is at 6 p.m. against Wheeling Jesuit. "I'm very strategic about who we seek out to come to this tournament.

University of West Florida

Research on HIV and other chronic diseases by an instructor at the University of West Florida Usha Kundu, MD College of Health has led to a year-long, international fellowship. 

Courtesy of Sacred Heart

August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month. And while nursing is the most natural and usually the healthiest option for a newborn, most new mothers need some help getting started. "We spend lots of time helping moms and babies get that initial latch and breastfeeding establishment done while we're in the hospital" said Kendal Vaughn, a Lactation Consultant at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Steve Box had a dilemma. For over a dozen years Mr. Box has taught choral and piano music at Shoal River Middle School in Crestview, and has been involved in music in Okaloosa County for over 30 years. One day, out of the blue, one of his students came to him and said she had to leave his class. "And she was a very good student, had tried out for all-state and done all the things that choral students do. So I said 'Wow, what's going on? Did I do something? Is somebody bothering you?' Maybe something going on in the class between the boys and girls? You know, middle school things.

Sacred Heart Pediatrics

Part of getting ready for the new school year is making sure students are up to date with their vaccines. While most parents are happy to immunize their children against life threatening diseases, there are still some loud voices in the media spreading doubt about vaccines. 

University of Missouri

You’d like to think that if anyone would have accurate information about global climate change it would be science teachers. But a new study funded by the National Science Foundation concludes that this is not always the case.  Dr. Ben Herman, an Assistant Professor of Science Education at the University of Missouri, was the lead researcher on the study. "[The study] was focused on the state of climate change education in Florida and the Caribbean. So part of that was [asking] what are the teacher knowledge bases and what are the climate change teaching practices.

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