Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

After one of her students grabbed her phone and took a photo of her racy selfie, teacher Leigh Anne Arthur resigned. The school district says she should have known better. But her students in Union, S.C., say Arthur was forced to resign — and they want her back.

Oregon's biggest power companies will have 14 years to wean themselves from coal, under a new bill approved by lawmakers Wednesday. The measure has the support of Gov. Kate Brown — and the state's two largest electric companies.

Several environmental groups have backed the bill, which calls for requiring large utilities to ensure that at least 50 percent of their power comes from renewable sources by 2040.

Backing a lower court's decision that extends a grace period for people displaced by a huge natural gas leak, an appeals court says Southern California Gas Co. should pay for temporary housing for an additional 30 days, rather than the eight-day period the company had planned.

On the heels of new U.N. sanctions that could crimp its economic dealings with China, North Korea has fired six projectiles — possibly rockets or missiles — into the sea on the country's eastern coast, South Korean officials say.

The projectiles that were fired Thursday flew for at least 60 miles before hitting the water, according to media reports in South Korea.

From Seoul, NPR's Elise Hu reports:

Announcing what it calls "the first cyber bug bounty program in the history of the federal government," the Department of Defense says it's inviting hackers to test the security of its Web pages and networks.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are the big winners the morning after Super Tuesday, each of them taking seven of the 13 states in play and adding to their leads.

On a day with the largest delegate total of this election season, Trump now has 285 delegates to 161 for Ted Cruz and 87 for Marco Rubio. In the Democratic race, Clinton has now won 543 delegates to Sanders' 349. When superdelegates are added to the tally, her lead grows to 1,000-371.

Here are five headlines that describe where we are in the race right now:

Los Angeles police officers used some type of force nearly 2,000 times last year, according to a new internal report. Officers shot 38 people — killing 21 of them — and more than a third of those shot had an indication of mental illness, the LAPD says.

In the five-year period from 2011 through 2015, LAPD officers shot 52 black suspects, according to the report — meaning that in a city where 9 percent of the population is black, nearly 30 percent of those shot by police were black.

Gov. Dennis Daugaard has vetoed a bill that would have required transgender students in South Dakota's public schools to use bathrooms, locker rooms and other facilities based on their gender at birth.

Daugaard issued the veto Tuesday afternoon on a bill that would have become law at midnight if he had taken no action.

Opponents of the measure, including the American Civil Liberties Union and the Human Rights Campaign, had called on Daugaard to veto the bill.

The badge denoting a Commander of the Order of the British Empire, the star worn by Knights of the Order of the Bath and other famous British medals are slated to be produced in France next year — a decision that has brought criticism from Britons who don't want their country's highest honors made on foreign soil.

In what's believed to be a first, the International Criminal Court in The Hague is contemplating a case that treats the destruction of cultural heritage as a war crime. The charges date to 2012, when Islamist militants attacked UNESCO world heritage sites in Timbuktu.

It's now well past midnight in South Korea – which means that a filibuster that started last Tuesday is on its way to lasting for a full week. Opposition legislators have now spoken for some 150 hours straight, holding up a bill that would give new surveillance powers to South Korea's spy agency.

For his part in an operation that rescued an American civilian who was being held hostage in Afghanistan, U.S. Navy SEAL Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator Edward Byers was presented with the Medal of Honor at the White House on Monday.

You can watch the event via White House video.

Saying that it will finally do business in the country that helped inspire its approach to coffee, Starbucks has announced plans to open its first store in Italy early next year, venturing into the cradle of espresso.

Saying that it is making the move "with humility and respect," Starbucks announced that its first store in Italy will be in Milan.

From Rome, NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports:

Nearly two months after he was detained in North Korea, University of Virginia student Otto Frederick Warmbier appeared at a news conference aired on state TV and said he attempted to steal a propaganda sign from his Pyongyang hotel.

A string of explosions at a Russian coal mine just inside the Arctic Circle has killed 36 people — miners trapped inside as well as rescue workers trying to help them, officials say. When the blasts hit last week, they caused a rock collapse and a fire that is still burning.

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