Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

The Senate approved a resolution Wednesday to nullify the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rollback, dealing a symbolic blow to the FCC's new rule that remains on track to take effect next month.

The final vote was 52-47. As expected, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, joined Democrats in voting to overturn the FCC's controversial decision. But two other Republicans — Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana and Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — also voted in favor of the resolution of disapproval.

Two cylinders that were dropped on the rebel-held Syrian city of Saraqeb in February — sending nearly a dozen people to seek medical help for nausea and other symptoms — had contained chlorine, according to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

After a visit to the site, the OPCW says, its fact-finding mission has confirmed "that chlorine was likely used as a chemical weapon" on Feb. 4 in Saraqeb, a small city that's about 12 miles southeast of Idlib. It also used evidence that was gathered by several nongovernmental organizations.

Less than two weeks after Iowa adopted a law banning most abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy, Planned Parenthood and the ACLU of Iowa have filed suit, seeking to prevent the law from taking effect.

Scheduled to take effect on July 1, Iowa's law is one of the most restrictive abortion measures in the U.S. The measure was signed by Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds on May 4, days after it was approved by the state legislature.

Asteroid 2010 WC9 was lost, then it was found — and now the small space rock that is hundreds of feet wide is zooming toward Earth, making a close but safe pass on Tuesday that will see it fly roughly halfway between our planet and the moon.

Before we continue: There is no risk of even a partial collision, and the asteroid will stay tens of thousands of miles away from the outer limits of Earth's atmosphere. So there's no reason to take cover when the asteroid makes its closest approach at 6:05 p.m. ET Tuesday.

One day after Israeli forces fired on protesters and killed 60 Palestinians along the Gaza border, the U.N.'s human rights commissioner says that those who were shot included women, children, journalists, first responders and bystanders.

"We condemn the appalling, deadly violence in Gaza yesterday," said Rupert Colville, spokesperson for the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Margot Kidder, who became famous for playing Lois Lane opposite Christopher Reeve in Superman, has died at her home in Montana. Kidder was 69; her acting career spanned decades, from TV series in the late 1960s to seven films in the past five years.

A cause of death has not yet been publicly released for Kidder. Her death was announced by the Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Mont., where she resided.

"The actress and activist passed away on Sun., May 13, 2018 at her home," the funeral home said.

A Southwest jetliner was hit with a "pressurization issue in flight," the airline says, resulting in oxygen masks dropping and a warning to ground personnel to have paramedics ready when the plane landed at Dallas Love Field on Saturday night. Four of the 120 passengers said they had ear pain as a result.

Flight 861 was on its way from Denver to Dallas when the crew radioed ahead to ask for help to be waiting for the Boeing 737.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of Palestinians are protesting the opening of the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, and Israeli army forces have killed 55 protesters, according to the Gaza Health Ministry. The ministry also says some 2,770 people have been hurt in demonstrations and clashes.

Another twist has emerged in the stunning ouster of Malaysia's long-ruling party, as Anwar Ibrahim, the popular opposition leader who was jailed for sodomy in 2015, will get a royal pardon — clearing the way for him to possibly become prime minister.

The Alpharetta, Ga., police department has suspended an officer and opened an internal investigation, after a traffic stop of a black woman devolved into the officer screaming an obscenity at the woman and pulling her roughly from her vehicle.

Under pressure to change its policies or lose the right to host golf at the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics, an exclusive golf club has now accepted three women as full members, breaking with decades of gender discrimination.

Founded in 1929, the private Kasumigaseki Country Club was picked to host the men's and women's Olympic tournaments. But the International Olympic Committee reiterated last year that if the club wanted to host the Olympics, it would have to change.

The Federal Communications Commission says that its order ending an era of "net neutrality" — the rules that restrict Internet service providers' ability to slow down or speed up users' access to specific websites and apps — will take effect on June 11.

That is one day before the Senate's June 12 deadline to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution filed by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass. The resolution aims to overturn the FCC's repeal of the Obama administration's Open Internet Order of 2015, which officially established net neutrality.

Sturm Ruger, one of the largest gun-makers in the U.S., will track and report on gun violence involving its products, after its shareholders backed a proposal that the company's board had recommended not adopting.

Ruger says that while it must now produce the gun violence report, the proposal — which it called a "shareholder's activist resolution" — cannot "force us to change our business."

The new requirement is part of Proposal 4, put forth by shareholders who want to see gun companies take more responsibility for preventing deadly violence in the U.S.

Updated at 12:49 p.m. ET

North Korea has released three Americans it had been holding captive, in a deal that was announced as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo ended his visit to the isolated country. They left the country with Pompeo and will arrive back in the U.S. early Thursday, with an expected arrival between 2 and 3 a.m. ET at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland. President Trump says he will meet them when they land.

Fair housing advocates are suing the Department of Housing and Urban Development to compel it to follow a rule meant to help prevent segregation and comply with the Fair Housing Act. The suit, which also names HUD Secretary Ben Carson, was filed Tuesday morning.

Connecticut is poised to commit its electoral votes to whichever U.S. presidential candidate wins the nation's popular vote — regardless of who wins the state.

By embracing the plan, Connecticut's General Assembly gave new momentum to a push to change the way Americans elect their president.

In what's seen as a direct appeal to President Trump, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson went on Fox & Friends and said it's possible to address concerns about the Iran nuclear deal and "not throw the baby out with the bathwater" by junking the agreement.

"We have to be tougher on Iran and we've got to fix the flaws in the deal," Johnson said Monday. But he added that the agreement can help avoid a nuclear arms race — one that would also include Saudi Arabia and other nations in the Middle East.

The brothers' Facebook pages are littered with jokes and jabs with their friends. They also post photos of their dog and their mom. They're described as quiet and thoughtful — except when they're rocking in their metal band, Snot Goblin.

In other words, they're American teenagers.

But Thomas Kanewakeron Gray, 19, and Lloyd Skanahwati Gray, 17, are also Native American — and their mother says their appearance was the reason police were called to question the pair as they tried to tour the campus of Colorado State University this week.

Updated at 1:01 p.m. ET

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and other top U.S. trade officials ended a round of talks in Beijing on Friday, failing to secure large goals that ranged from cutting the trade imbalance by $200 billion by the end of 2020 to stopping China from targeting U.S. technology and intellectual property.

Both sides say the talks will continue with quarterly meetings.

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