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Europe
10:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Both Sides Dig In Their Heels Over Crimea Crisis

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Ukraine shares a long history with Russia, but the latest crisis is driving a wedge between the two countries and reinforcing a sense of national identity among many Ukrainians.

Around the Nation
10:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Fort Hood Shooting Reopened Wounds At Trauma Unit

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. U.S. Army officials are saying that an argument may have set off Specialist Ivan Lopez, who went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood this past week. He killed four people, including himself, and injured 16 others. Those who survived were taken to Baylor Scott and White Hospital nearby in Temple, Texas. Dr. Matthew Davis is the head of the trauma program there. He and his staff also treated the injured after the 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood.

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Asia
10:22 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Japan Releases Inmate After Nearly A Half-Century On Death Row

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 12:49 pm

A court in Japan recently released Iwao Hakamada, thought to be the world's longest-serving death row inmate. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with David Johnson, an expert on Japan's legal system.

Remembrances
9:34 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Peter Matthiessen, Co-Founder Of The Paris Review, Dies At 86

Peter Matthiessen, shown here at his New York house in 2004, was a Zen Buddhist priest, a spy, an activist and a well-respected writer of both fiction and nonfiction.
Ed Betz AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 12:34 pm

Author Peter Matthiessen has died in New York at the age of 86 from acute myeloid leukemia. Matthiessen, a novelist and naturalist, wrote 33 books; among his best-known works are The Snow Leopard and the novels Far Tortuga and At Play in the Fields of the Lord, which was made into a Hollywood film.

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The Two-Way
9:31 am
Sun April 6, 2014

Mudslide Tragedy: Donations Outpace Capacity In Oso

Gabriella Botamanenko (center left) hugs her mother, Angela Botamanenko, during a vigil for mudslide victims at the Darrington Community Center Saturday. A March 22 mudslide in a nearby community killed at least 30 and left many missing.
David Ryder Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 10:46 am

It's been two weeks since the massive mudslide came down on a tiny mountain community in Washington state. The disaster killed 30 people; 13 are still missing. The tragedy prompted an outpouring of donations — and officials in Oso say they don't have room for more items.

Federal disaster relief officials are visiting the site Sunday, as member station KUOW's Sara Lerner reports for our Newscast unit:

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