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Goats and Soda
1:58 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

Protective gear runs from goggles and head covering to gloves and boots. This health worker was photographed leaving the isolation area at the treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:56 pm

The fight against Ebola in West Africa suffered a setback Wednesday. Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, one of the top doctors treating patients, caught the virus, even though he was wearing protective gear.

"Even with the full protective clothing you put on," Khan has said, "you are at risk."

That statement made us wonder about those yellow and white suits you see in photos: Just how good are they at protecting health workers from the bodily fluids that can transmit the virus — vomit, blood, sweat, mucus?

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Central American Presidents Say U.S. Shares Responsibility For Migration Crisis

President of Honduras Juan Orlando Hernandez, left, delivers remarks on immigration beside President of Guatemala Otto Perez Molina.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:45 pm

The presidents of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador will meet with President Obama on Friday.

But before the meeting, the heads of state are making the rounds in Washington, telling their side of an immigration crisis that has driven tens of thousands of unaccompanied children to the U.S. border.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

You Might Call This Story Sour Grapes

Wine fraud has existed as long as wine has been made, but Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. (Alessio Maffeis/Flickr)

It was an elaborate con involving wine and some of America’s wealthiest collectors.

Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. He manufactured phony vintages in his kitchen and sold more than $35 million worth in 2006 alone.

The BBC’s business correspondent, Michelle Fleury, reports on the case as it moves towards sentencing.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Veterans Say Suicide Is Their Top Concern

House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, R-Fla., joined by Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., at right, speaks on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, July 10, during a news conference on a bill to combat veteran suicides. Miller introduced the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act to combat veteran suicide. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 2:03 pm

It’s estimated that 22 military veterans commit suicide every day, but if you talk to people who are familiar with this issue, they’ll tell you the real number is probably higher. The latest statistics from the Pentagon show that suicides among active duty military are up slightly, compared to the same period last year. There have been 161 confirmed or suspected suicides so far in 2014. There were 154 by this time last year.

According to the Associated Press, suicides are up among Navy and Air Force personnel. The numbers are down for soldiers and Marines.

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NPR Story
1:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Good Movies You Might Have Missed

The movie "Snowpiecer" opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you. (Courtesy)

The movie “Snowpiercer” opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago, but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you.

In fact, as Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr has noted, a number of good films have either not been released widely, or disappeared from movie theaters before audiences could discover them.

He shares a few of his recent favorites with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti, including “The Immigrant,” “Fading Gigolo,” “Land Ho!” and “Edge of Tomorrow.”

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