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NPR Story
1:15 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Ebola Denial Still A 'Huge Problem,' Despite Few New Cases In Guinea

A Guinean student gets his temperature checked on January 19, 2015 as he enters at the Oumou Diaby school in the Ratoma area of Conakry as students head back to school after nearly four months of school recess due to the Ebola outbreak. (Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images)

The number of new Ebola cases in Guinea is dropping steadily. According to the World Health Organization, there were a total of 20 confirmed cases this week, down from 45 last week, the lowest number since August of last year.

The government is shooting for zero Ebola cases by mid-March, and schools are back in session for the first time since July of last year.

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Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

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Music
12:25 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Producer Cosimo Matassa Always Believed In New Orleans

New Orleans music didn't do as well in the 1960s, a few hits notwithstanding, as it had done. Musicians left town, major labels lost interest, and Motown and Memphis took over the black music charts. Nonetheless, the late Cosimo Matassa, who owned the only recording studio in town, kept busy. Fresh Air rock historian Ed Ward has the story today.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Who Is The New Saudi King?

Saudi King Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud makes his first speech as king following the death of his half-brother Abdullah on Friday in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 2:03 pm

King Salman, who has assumed the Saudi monarchy after the death of his half-brother King Abdullah, has promised it will be business as usual in the oil-rich Arab kingdom.

Salman, 79, has pledged to "continue adhering to the correct policies which Saudi Arabia has followed since its establishment."

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The Two-Way
10:56 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Goodbye, Garden Yeti: In-Flight Catalog SkyMall Files For Bankruptcy

A signature SkyMall item: The hot dog bun toaster.
SkyMall

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 5:28 pm

SkyMall, the ubiquitous in-flight catalog that always reliably greets you in the seatback pocket, is falling victim to technological innovation.

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Shots - Health News
10:55 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Young Women And Men Seek More Equal Roles At Work And Home

Tooga Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 3:02 pm

Young women these days are encouraged to lean in, to want and have it all. And national polls show the idea that a woman's place is in the home has been losing traction among young people since the 1960s.

Given the option, the majority of young men and women say they would prefer to share both work and domestic duties equally with their spouses, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Sociological Review.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Argentine President Now Says Prosecutor's Death 'Not A Suicide'

Alberto Nisman, the prosecutor investigating the 1994 bombing of the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association community center, talks to journalists in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 2013. Nisman was found shot dead in his apartment on Sunday.
Natacha Pisarenko AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 3:41 pm

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez has done an about-face on her initial statements that prosecutor Alberto Nisman's death earlier this week was suicide.

Nisman, 51, had been investigating an alleged government cover-up of Iran's suspected role in the 1994 bombing of the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association community center in Buenos Aires that killed 85 people.

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Goats and Soda
9:25 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Dear World: Bill And Melinda Gates Have 'Big Bets' For 2030

Cellphones are everywhere in the developing world, as this Nairobi street scene shows. Bill and Melinda Gates believe the phones can be used for everything from farmer education to instant banking.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 12:19 pm

Each year for the past six years, Bill and Melinda Gates have written a letter about how their foundation is trying to make the world a better place, how they're trying to improve health and education and end poverty. Their 2015 letter was published Wednesday on the foundation's blog. (Note: The Gates Foundation is a supporter of NPR.)

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The Two-Way
9:07 am
Fri January 23, 2015

TSA Agents Discovered 2,212 Guns At Airport Checkpoints In 2014

TSA agents, like this one at Chicago's Midway International Airport, discovered more than 2,000 firearms at the nation's airports last year — the overwhelming majority of them loaded, according to new data.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 3:08 pm

The Transportation Security Administration found more than 2,000 firearms at the nation's airports last year — the overwhelming majority of them loaded, the Department of Homeland Security said today.

TSA agents discovered 2,212 firearms — or a little more than six a day — in carry-on bags; 83 percent of them were loaded, the department said.

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It's All Politics
9:06 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Senate Says Climate Change Real, But Not Really Our Fault

Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., was the only senator to vote against an amendment calling climate change "real and not a hoax."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:20 pm

Breathtakingly broad as its jurisdiction may be, the U.S. Senate does not usually vote on the validity of scientific theories.

This week, it did. And science won. The Senate voted that climate change is real, and not a hoax. The vote was 98-1.

The vote was about an amendment to the bill approving the Keystone XL pipeline. The near-unanimity of the climate change judgment was notable, because so many senators have cast doubt on ideas of "global warming."

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