Science
4:02 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Soil Doctors Hit Pay Dirt In Manhattan's Central Park

The Bronx may be up and the Battery down, but Central Park is where an amazing wealth of different sorts of microbes play.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 8:14 am

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

They were 10 soil ecologists — aka dirt doctors. Kelly Ramirez from Colorado State University was among them. "We met on the steps of the natural history museum at 7 a.m. with our collection gear, coolers and sunblock," she recalls.

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Cities Project
2:23 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Ghosts Of The Past Still Echo In Beirut's Fragmented Neighborhoods

Lebanon's parliament sits in Beirut's rebuilt Nejmeh Square, near the center of the city. Unlike many of Beirut's neighborhoods, the square is often mostly empty.
Tim Fitzsimons NPR

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:26 am

The heart of downtown Beirut is an elegant area, fringed with expensive buildings. But on a beautiful sunny day, you may not find anyone there — there's no cafe, no park, no place for people to hang out.

Even though the Lebanese capital is a bustling and even glamorous place, the heart of Beirut is empty.

That's because the ghosts of this otherwise vibrant city's past still play out in Beirut's neighborhoods. Decades after Lebanon's civil war in the 1980s, those divides still carve up the city and help determine who lives where and who interacts with whom.

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The Two-Way
11:54 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Giants Send Pirates Packing In Elimination Playoff Game

San Francisco Giants' Brandon Crawford, center, is greeted by teammates Brandon Belt, left, and Hunter Pence after hitting a grand slam against the Pittsburgh Pirates in the fourth inning of Wednesday night's game.
Don Wright AP

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 6:04 am

The San Francisco Giants decisively beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 8-0 in the National League wild-card game Wednesday night in Pittsburgh.

The record crowd on hand at PNC Park, mostly dressed in black, was no match for the Giants' bats and their pitcher's arm.

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Commentary
7:04 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Carl Wernicke: The Pleasure Of Small-Time

Credit IHMC

I have always loved newspapers. They’ve been called the first draft of history, an elegant phrase. And what I have found is that the smaller the paper, the more intimate the news. So as a traveler I have long made it a practice to buy the weekly and other small publications wherever I go, to try to get a sense of that community.

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Election 2014
6:50 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

LISTEN: Libertarian Adrian Wyllie Campaigns In Pensacola

Credit Wyllie For Governor

He wants pot to be legal, he wants all property taxes abolished and he refuses to get a driver's license.  Oh, and he wants to be Governor.

Adrian Wyllie, the Libertarian candidate for Governor of Florida has been stumping around the state for well over a year talking to anyone who'll listen to his platform of less taxes and fewer regulations. He spoke this week to WUWF's Bob Barrett about getting the Libertarian message out across the state.

He said we should get some news on his battle to be included in the gubernatorial debates within a week.

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Election 2014
6:43 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Scott Mailer "Voter Alert" Appears Intentionally Misleading

Voters across Florida are getting mailers from Gov. Rick Scott’s campaign, which are leading to some concerns about their absentee ballots. However, there are NO problems with the ballots.

A column by Andy Marlette on the Pensacola News Journal’s website says that Scott’s “Let’s Get to Work” campaign has sent out flyers with “Voter Alert” in bold, red type, and a warning that “Your absentee ballot should have arrived.” That drew the attention of David Stafford – Escambia County’s Supervisor of Elections.

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The Two-Way
6:28 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

One Picture, Of 35,000 Walrus, Shows One Effect Of Global Warming

In this aerial photo taken on Sept. 27, 2014, and provided by NOAA, some 35,000 walrus gather on shore near Point Lay, Alaska.
Corey Accardo AP

This stunning picture is making the rounds on the Internet today:

It was released by NOAA's Aerial Surveys of Arctic Marine Mammals and shows an estimated 35,000 walrus "hauling out" on an Alaskan beach.

This is not normally how you would find them. The animals would normally be spread out on the sea ice, but, as you see in the picture, this year the ice has all melted.

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Shots - Health News
5:40 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

On The Alert For Ebola, Texas Hospital Still Missed First Case

Traffic moves past Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where a patient showed up with symptoms that were later confirmed to be Ebola.
Mike Stone Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 2, 2014 7:57 am

Hospitals have been on the lookout for the Ebola virus in the United States, and Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas was no exception. A nurse there did ask about the travel history of the patient who later turned out to be infected with the virus. But some members of the medical team didn't hear that the man had recently been in West Africa. So he was initially sent home — even though he was experiencing symptoms of Ebola, and that meant he was contagious.

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Parallels
5:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Movement Against Female Genital Mutilation Gains Spotlight In U.K.

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks with campaigners against female genital mutilation at the Girl Summit in London in July.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

In Washington Thursday, a group of experts from across the government will hold its first meeting to address the practice known as female genital mutilation. This is one issue where the U.K. is far ahead of the United States.

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Shots - Health News
5:14 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Obamacare's First Year: How'd It Go?

In New Jersey in March, Dianna Lopez of the Center for Family Services (right) speaks with Betsy Cruz, of Camden, N.J., about health insurance coverage during an Affordable Care Act information session.
Lori M. Nichols South Jersey Times/Landov

Exactly one year ago, the Obamacare insurance exchanges stumbled into existence. Consumers struggled to sign up for its online marketplace — and the Obama administration was pummeled. Eventually, HealthCare.gov's problems were mostly fixed, and two weeks ago, the administration announced 7.3 million people have bought insurance through it so far this year.

So, was the health exchanges' first year a success — or something less?

Ask President Obama, and he says you measure the Affordable Care Act's success this way:

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