There’s a change in the lineup on the horizon at Sacred Heart Health System, in the area of child health care. 

Work is underway to finalize a contract with Gainesville-based University of Florida Health, as the deal with longtime provider Nemours is set to expire at year’s end after 19 years. Susan Davis is Sacred Heart Health System President and CEO.  


In this week’s Economic Report, Dr. Rick Harper discusses the reasons that the Federal Reserve continues to hold interest rates and what tools they have at their disposal to normalize the economy.


After last week’s announcement that the Federal Reserve would once again hold interest rates, many were left wondering why, particularly when low interest rates hurt those trying to save.


WUWF Public Media

Sightline, the reading service based at WUWF, is celebrating its fifth anniversary at the station. 

SightLine volunteers read content of local and regional interest, to area residents with vision impairment or other disabilities which make reading difficult. Pat Crawford, WUWF’s Executive Director, says the decision to take over the service from WSRE, who had it for 18 years, stemmed from cuts in state funding.

12-year-old Christina Clark takes medical marijuana.

Her mother Anneliese Clark uses it to treat the seizures her daughter has had since she was three months old. At her worst, “she just literally, she wasn’t doing anything,” Anneliese Clark said. “She laid on the couch and shook and twitched.”

Clark remembers Christina locked in a fetal position, unable to hold her head up, swallow her own spit, or control her bodily functions. After trying 17 different pharmaceutical drugs, Anneliese turned to medical marijuana.

It's a busy Monday morning at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic, and Philip Ertel is here for a check-up. The 60-year-old needs refills for his diabetes and cholesterol medications.

Dr. Trudy Grossman pulls out a stethoscope and checks his lungs. He takes deep breaths in and out.

Ertel works full-time in a restaurant at a hotel on St. Pete Beach, but he doesn't have health insurance because he can't afford the monthly premiums.

Go South To Freedom

Sep 28, 2016
New South Books

An author from Mobile has written a new children’s book about a family of escaped slaves in the 1830's who found freedom by traveling south. The book is called Go South To Freedom, and it’s the work of Frye Gaillard, an author and the Writer in Residence at the University of South Alabama in Mobile. He talked with WUWF's Bob Barrett about what inspired the story.

In the wake of the news that Monty Python founding member Terry Jones has been diagnosed with dementia, we look back at his visits to the University of West Florida.

In a statement released by Britain's film academy, a representative says the 74-year-old Jones has primary progressive aphasia, which erodes the ability to use language. As a result, he can no longer give interviews.

Another mosquito-borne illness alert is going out from the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County, after a second case of West Nile virus for 2016 was confirmed in a county resident.

This is the second such case in as many months and neither patient is being identified. Mosquitoes are known carriers of West Nile and there are concerns that other residents and visitors may become ill from bites.

DOH-Escambia Director Dr. John Lanza reminds us that West Nile has different impacts on different people, and can also be mistaken for other ailments.

Pensacola Symphony Orchestra

The Pensacola Symphony Orchestra will kick off the 2016-17 season with their Opening Night performance on this Saturday, October 1 at the Saenger Theatre.

This will be the orchestra’s 20th season under the direction of Music Director Peter Rubardt.

Bob Barrett


Live fact-checking from the NPR Politics team.


Carol Myers

  Researchers at the University of West Florida are out with a first-of-its-kind study, assessing the health effects of the major flood that hit the Pensacola area in 2014. 

The Health Impact Assessment (HIA)  also involved the Florida Department of Health, and was funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Gulf Islands National Seashore

  Major road work is getting underway at Gulf Islands National Seashore – again. 

The timing of the multiple projects is no accident. It’s late September and the end of the shorebird nesting season at Gulf Islands National Seashore, where Dan Brown is Superintendent. 

“We wrote that right into the contract, and wanted them to get started as quickly as they possibly could following the end of shorebird nesting season,” Brown said. “So that they would be completely done in March, when the shorebirds start nesting again.”


  After a busy summer, Manna Food Pantries is looking forward to stocking up for the rest of the year and getting ready to move. It was late April when the food bank announced it had closed on a new home. Now, almost 6 months later, they are still in their old location on Gonzalez Street.

  The autumnal equinox arrived at 9:21 Central time on Thursday morning. But as we go from summer to fall, another season still has about ten more weeks to run. 

We remain in what’s considered the peak of the 2016 hurricane season in the Atlantic and Caribbean. Gerry Bell at the National Hurricane Center says moving into fall has zero effect.

“There’s really no relationship at all,” said Bell. “The peak of the hurricane season is August, September and October, so it’s a broad peak and the equinox just happens to coincide in September.”