News

This week the WSRE Speaker’s series at Pensacola State College features a duo who helped create the 90s TV show Mystery Science Theater 3000. Trace Beaulieu and Frank Conniff wrote for and appeared on seven seasons of the program, then went on to create Cinematic Titanic, a touring show that also made fun of bad films. The pair will be appearing along with a grade B movie this Thursday evening. Here they speak about the renewed interest in the franchise.

OneBlood/LinkedIn

Heading into the holiday weekend and the summer season, area blood banks are putting out the call for more donations. Supplies of both O-Negative and O-Positive blood are low across the region right now. Pat Michaels is a spokesperson for OneBlood, the blood center for Pensacola and the panhandle. "We want to make sure that we have a very strong blood supply. As you might know, blood donations may not be enough in some cases to keep up with demand. But it's our job as a blood center to make sure we have enough blood on the shelf for all of the hospitals and transfusions."

Photo via Flickr//Shannon McGee / https://flic.kr/p/nGjxKp

Summer is on the way and so are more festival scams. The Better Business Bureau says would-be festival goers are being tempted to buy tickets which are either fake or for a bogus event.

Here’s how such a scam could work: you see a great deal on tickets to a summer festival in your city, usually through a social media link.

Photo via Flickr//Mrio / https://flic.kr/p/cdSxaL

National Safe Boating Week kicked off Saturday, and runs through the Memorial Day weekend.

With more than 900,000, Florida leads the nation in the number of registered vessels. The 10-day “week” is aimed at reminding those planning to spend time on the water this summer to do it safely. Part of that advice comes from Capt. Tom Shipp of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

 

In this week’s Economic Report, Dr. Rick Harper discusses record numbers of visitors in the first quarter of 2016 and the direct effect on Florida’s tourism job numbers.

 

Florida’s tourism business is booming. A report released by the governor’s office this week said that 29.8 million visitors came to the state in the first quarter of 2016, an increase of 4.8 percent over the same period last year.

 

Dave Dunwoody

Fifteen Escambia County Sheriff’s deputies who have died in the line of duty from 1923-2004 were remembered Thursday, at the annual service at Escambia County Sheriff's Office headquarters.

Family and friends of the fallen deputies, along with law enforcement personnel from various agencies and some elected officials, gathered first in the training room at the Sheriff’s Office on “L” Street, and were greeted by Sheriff David Morgan.

Photo via Flickr// Florida Fish and Wildlife / https://flic.kr/p/nzFLdu

Residents in the Florida Panhandle are being encouraged to become “Bear Aware:” keeping bears and other wildlife away from their homes.

Florida’s largest land mammal is a conservation success story. Only a few hundred black bears were around in the 1970s. Today, more than 4,300 roam the state and, in some cases, they mosey into residential areas.

Weather: "People Don't Fear The Water Enough"

May 18, 2016

"People Don't Fear the Water Enough"

The 2016 Atlantic Hurricane season is right around the corner and so it’s time to prepare. From the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, meteorologist Jeff Huffman reports, the first consideration should involve your home’s proximity to the water.

It’s not enough to just say you’ll be ready. National Hurricane Center Director Dr. Rick Knabb says you need a plan. And it’s easy.

Dave Dunwoody

Hurricane season kicks off June 1st and Escambia County joined Florida’s other 66 counties in conducting a dress rehearsal.

Here’s the scenario: Hurricane Kimo, a Category-4 storm, has made landfall in Florida. A Cat-4 packs winds from 130-156 miles an hour which, along with storm surge and tornadoes, can do a lot of damage in a short period of time.

“One of the things that we do not do as well as I think we need to do is the late response and early recovery stuff. And that’s what we’re focusing our energy on today,” said Escambia Emergency Director John Dosh.  

IHMC

Having lived almost all of my life in Northwest Florida, I can’t really speak to how it is to live in other places. But the variety of lifescapes offered by this area must be hard to beat.

That is underscored by our recent move from rural Garcon Point to urbanized Pensacola Beach. The culture shock could hardly be overstated.

Michael Spooneybarger/CREO

 

Three second-grade students sit around a table shaped like a semicircle. They read “Rumplestiltskin” aloud. Two whisper, and one uses a normal tone of voice.

Their teacher, Katherine Folse, follows along, stopping to call attention to certain vocabulary words: muttered, sobbed and strode. They pause and discuss meanings before turning back to the story.

photo via Flickr//Greg Grimes / https://flic.kr/p/6yCgRe

Ten years ago this week, the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany began her final mission: putting Pensacola on the map as a diving mecca.

Commissioned in 1950, the Oriskany served during the Korean and Vietnam Conflicts before its decommissioning in 1976. And if you’ve ever seen the 1953 movie “The Bridges at Toko-Ri” starring William Holden, then you’ve seen the Oriskany, where much of it was filmed.

FDOT

Soon you make not have to go searching for a dollar bill to get to Pensacola Beach: beginning May 31st, the Bob Sykes Bridge, connecting Gulf Breeze and Pensacola Beach, will begin accepting Sun Pass for the one dollar toll.

A 9/11 International Memorial Flag was unveiled at the Destin-Ft. Walton Beach Airport Monday afternoon. The 9/11 Memorial Flag consists of nearly three thousand smaller American Flags sewn together into one massive Memorial Flag. Each flag represents a victim from the World Trade Center, Pentagon, Virginia and Flight #93 that lost their life in the 2001 terrorist attack on the U. S.

Port of Pensacola

Over the next five years almost $4 billion is projected to flow to Florida's seaports to handle growing international trade.

A report from the Florida Ports Council says the money will come from state and local governments, as well as the private sector. 

“For Pensacola’s part of that, it’s all based on five-year capital plans that each of the ports submit every year,” says Port of Pensacola Director Amy Miller. “Pensacola’s current five-year capital calls for about $21 million in capital improvements over the next five years.”

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