News

Linda Dunwoody / Sacred Heart Health System

The Pensacola community now has a new option for end of life care for seriously ill patients and their families with the opening of the Covenant Care Inpatient Hospice Center at Sacred Heart Hospital.

“When you look around, all I can say is wow,” said Covenant Care President and CEO Jeff Mislevy, referring to the new hospice center and the crowd of supporters gathered for the recent ribbon cutting.

cdc.gov

Escambia County’s first case of West Nile virus is now confirmed, prompting reminders about how to protect yourself from the disease.

As is the practice, the patient is not being identified – other than they’re an Escambia County resident. The Florida Department of Health-Escambia has issued a mosquito-borne illness advisory, for what Health Director Dr. John Lanza calls an “endemic.”

As it begins its trek through Louisiana, Tropical Storm Harvey is being felt across the Florida Panhandle and south Alabama.

Rain and plenty of it, compliments of Harvey, is forecast to inundate the area at least through Thursday across southeast Mississippi, southwest Alabama and northwest Florida.

“We’ve already received in the Pensacola Metro four to six inches; we’ve seen a couple of isolated gauge reports of seven inches,” says meteorologist Jason Beaman at the National Weather Service in Mobile.

bbb.org

Calls are going out to help those victimized by Hurricane Harvey. But the challenge is, which are legitimate and which are not? That’s where the Better Business Bureau can help.

More than 20 inches of rain has fallen over parts of Texas, with another 15-25 inches expected in the days to come. Help is pouring in, and neighbors have been helping neighbors.

That’s the best of it; then there’s the dark side.

University of West Florida

The University of West Florida held an open house for their fall athletics programs Tuesday afternoon in preparation for the season starting this weekend. "Honestly, if you're in Pensacola this weekend and you're not in our gym, you're going to miss out!" said UWF Women’s Volleyball Head Coach Melissa Wolter. The season opening Hampton Inn-Vitational Tournament begins this Thursday evening at the university field house. UWF's first game is at 6 p.m. against Wheeling Jesuit. "I'm very strategic about who we seek out to come to this tournament.

When it comes to movies and books, there are two kinds of people: those who like to reread, or rewatch their favorites, and those who prefer something new. Personally, I fall into the read or watch it again group.

Now, it might seem silly for this divide to occur. I mean, people who like tennis wouldn’t put the racket down forever after one game. And steak lovers would never finish a great ribeye and declare edamame the next frontier.

Of course, I enjoyed my one and only skydiving adventure, but one time jumping out of a perfectly good airplane was enough.

pbs.org

As east Texas continues to be deluged by the remnants of Hurricane Harvey, help is coming from a number of states, including Florida. And some of that assistance is from the Panhandle.

“This has happened to us, we know what its like,” said Jerry Kindle, Executive Director of the American Red Cross' northwest Florida chapter. "The Gulf Coast has always been a very giving community, and we appreciate all the assistance we’re getting.”

The deployments from the Red Cross' service area in the Panhandle began Friday to both Texas and Louisiana.

University of West Florida

Research on HIV and other chronic diseases by an instructor at the University of West Florida Usha Kundu, MD College of Health has led to a year-long, international fellowship. 

WUWF Public Media

iTEN WIRED, the annual conference that draws executives, engineers, entrepreneurs and others in the technology fields, is set for early October at Pensacola Beach.

This event dates back to 2009, when the Pensacola Chamber of Commerce began it as a quarterly event. But Jim Rhodes, now in his fifth year as conference director, says it eventually morphed into the annual event of today.

While Florida is not in the path of Hurricane Harvey, the storm’s effects could be felt as early as next week, both outdoors and at the gas pump.

Harvey is forecast to strengthen to a Category-3 storm before reaching south or central Texas late Friday night or early Saturday morning,the first hurricane to hit Texas since 2008, when Ike crashed ashore near Galveston killing 21 people in Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas, and causing widespread destruction.

The state of Florida is getting set to roll out newly designed driver’s licenses and state I.D. cards. Beginning Monday, Aug. 28, the Okaloosa County Tax Collector’s Office will be one of eight around the state that will begin issuing the new credentials.

Anthropologists have long been fascinated with the evolution of mankind, both physically and culturally. In the past this largely depended on reading the historical record. But today we have entered the era of evolution as a forced march, driven hard by what could be the most insidious horror ever unleashed on humanity:

The cell phone.

cdc.gov

Sacred Heart Hospital is launching “Prevent T-2,” a new diabetes program aimed at helping pre-diabetic people avoid development of the disease.

“T-2” refers to type-2 diabetes.

“A ‘pre-diabetic’ is a person who falls into a blood sugar range that’s not quite diabetes yet,” says Ethel Hoyt, a registered nurse and patient educator at Sacred Heart. She is the program’s facilitator.

Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee

Father William Wack was ordained and installed as the sixth Bishop to serve the Pensacola-Tallahassee Catholic Diocese Tuesday, in a ceremony at the Pensacola Bay Center.

The Bay Center was selected as the venue for the high mass over the 57 parishes in the sprawling diocese, because of the expected attendance. The front row was occupied by Wack’s family – he’s one of nine siblings. Both upper and lower decks were filed with friends, Catholic school students, and other supporters. – including a contingent from his former parish, St. Ignatius in Austin, Texas.

Pensacola Habitat for Humanity wants to engage area residents in a discussion of issues that will lead to a more compassionate community at their Third Annual Community Summit. “Building Community: Enhancing Our Sense of “We” will be held this Wednesday at the Sanders Beach-Corrine Jones Resource Center.

nasa.gov

After months of anticipation, the first total solar eclipse across the United States in almost four decades did not disappoint – even in areas with some cloud cover, such as Pensacola.

Hundreds gathered at the Planetarium at Pensacola State College to view something nobody in this country had seen since 1979.The moon began moving across the sun just after noon, with peak coverage roughly 82 percent at 1:37 p.m.

Retired PSC astronomer Wayne Wooten had a selection of telescopes on hand, including one antique model that dates back to the start of the Apollo space program.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Debate is underway at Pensacola City Hall, over the proposed removal of a Confederate monument from its current location. If it is removed, a local cemetery is ready to accept it.

St. John’s Cemetery on G Street could become the new home for the “Our Confederate Dead” monument, which was erected in 1891 at Robert E. Lee Square.

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

After the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over removal of a Confederate monument, efforts to remove a Confederate memorial in downtown Pensacola are gaining steam.

Pensacola’s Confederate monument is located at Lee Square on Palafox Street, downtown. It was dedicated back in 1891, more than a quarter-century (26 years) after the Civil War.

nasa.gov

Americans across all 50 United States will get a treat from Mother Nature on Monday -- the first total solar eclipse visible nationwide in 38 years.

While the entire nation will experience some level of eclipse, the path of the “umbra” – where the eclipse is total – will be only about 100 miles wide and stretch from Oregon to South Carolina.

“We’re about 400 miles south of the center line, where they’ll see totality,” said Dr. Wayne Wooten, an astronomer who recently retired from Pensacola State College.

Recently I came across a fascinating article on the discovery in France of spectacular ruins. Developers working on a new subdivision uncovered an ancient Roman suburb that was remarkably preserved.

According to The New York Times article, the ruins included shops for metalworking, grocery stores, a warehouse full of wine jugs, a couple of houses with expensive floor mosaics and more.

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